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Chinese Horse Armour - Different components


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#1 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 05:05 AM

Posted Image

I found it on tiexue forum.

The different parts of the horse armour are shown above and they are:

寄生 Ji Shen
鞍具及镫 Anju ji Deng
冲帘 Chong Lian (can someone pls verify if this is correct?)
鸡劲?Ji Jing (can someone pls help verify what that is.. I can't read it b'cos it's not clear)
搭后 Dahou
当胸 Dang Xiong
马身甲 Ma Shen Jia

Does anyone know the english translation for these different components of a horse armour? Can someone pls verify if the terms are correct?
Posted ImagePosted Image

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#2 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 09:10 PM

Maybe, let me try and translate them into english

寄生 Ji Shen (horse-tail)
鞍具及镫 Anju ji Deng (horse-seat)
冲帘 Chong Lian (horse-head gear)
鸡劲?Ji Jing (neck gear)
搭后 Dahou (horse-back)
当胸 Dang Xiong (breast-gear)
马身甲 Ma Shen Jia (body armour)
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#3 snowybeagle

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Posted 14 June 2006 - 09:43 PM

The English term for armor for horses is barding. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barding
Note that the European barding would be different in design and materials from Chinese barding.

寄生 j shēng (Ornamental plumage)

鞍具及镫 ān j j dng (Saddle and Stirrups)

冲帘 chng lin (chamfron or champron). Some have rondel with a small spike as decorative piece.

鸡劲(?) jī jng (crinet or criniere or manefaire). But European crinet was a set of segmented plates.

搭后 dā hu (crupper)

当胸 dāng xiōng (peytral)

马身甲 mă shēn jiă (flank armor or flanchard). European knights also adorn their steeds with ornamental coverings known as caparison, such as those seen during jousting tournaments.

References: GLOSSARY OF ARMOUR from Norton Armouries
Armour Glossary

Edited by snowybeagle, 14 June 2006 - 09:46 PM.


#4 Liu Bei

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Posted 16 June 2006 - 11:30 PM

鸡劲?Ji Jing (neck gear)

lol chicken neck. :rolleyes:
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#5 Yun

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 11:17 AM

Good work there, Snowybeagle! However, the diagram itself has made some mistakes in names. The names are based on the Song-dynasty Wujing Zongyao 《武经总要》, but the picture depicts Age of Fragmentation-style barding rather than Song-style barding. According to the Wujing Zongyao, 冲帘 should be Mianlian 面帘, 当胸 should be Dangxiong 荡胸, and 鸡劲 should be Jixiang 鸡项.

The name 鸡项 was probably inspired by that piece of armour making a horse's neck look like that of a feathered chicken? But note that according to my book on Ancient Chinese Chariots, Carriages, and Horse Fittings (《中国古代车舆马具》 by Liu Yonghua 刘永华), during the Age of Fragmentation the chamfron was known as a 马胄 and the crinet was known as a 护项. The names 面帘 and 鸡项 originated later on. Furthermore, the 荡胸 (peytral) did not exist as a separate piece in the Age of Fragmentation, Sui and Tang - instead, it was connected to the flank armour (马身甲).

The Jisheng 寄生, other than being ornamental, probably also served identification and protective functions. For example, it might be coloured in a certain way to identify the commanding officer or all the troops on the same side. It could also deflect a sword stroke or lance thrust from behind, or serve as cover when the cavalryman turned back to deliver a Parthian shot. There were various types shaped like fans, tree branches, numerous tongues of flame mounted on poles, or feathers. By the early Tang, the Jisheng had lost most of its practical function and changed into a vase-shaped object in which decorative items like feathers could be stuck. In the mid-Tang, the Jisheng was phased out completely (along with heavy horse barding), and was never revived. The Wujing Zongyao description and diagram of horse armour does not include a Jisheng. The Jisheng is thus unique to Age of Fragmentation, Sui and early Tang horse armour.

The distinctive feature of Song horse armour, on the other hand, is a fan-shaped crest on the chamfron.
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#6 Yun

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Posted 18 June 2006 - 11:32 AM

Here's an example of Song-period horse barding:
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