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History of Chinese in Malaysia


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#1 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 04 November 2004 - 09:49 AM

There are also many chinese in Malaysia

When did the 1st chinese arrived in Malaysia?

I heard that Kuala Lumpur was 1st settled by chinese tin miners imported from Canton. Essentially, Kuala Lumpur was predominantly cantonese

Penang was mostly hokkien.

Can someone tell me more about history of chinese in Malaysia?
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#2 Guest_clio001_*

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Posted 12 November 2004 - 04:05 AM

There are also many chinese in Malaysia

When did the 1st chinese arrived in Malaysia?

I heard that Kuala Lumpur was 1st settled by chinese tin miners imported from Canton. Essentially, Kuala Lumpur was predominantly cantonese

Penang was mostly hokkien.

Can someone tell me more about history of chinese in Malaysia?

<{POST_SNAPBACK}>

You are right. Chinese came mostly as tin miners. The British imported them mostly from southern China. Thus, there are many Cantonese, Hokkien, Hakka, Teowchew, Foochow and several other groups. Yap Ah Loy was the famous Chinese Captain (Kapitan Cina) in Kuala Lumpur during the 19th century. And several mining cities during that time included Kuala Lumpur, Taiping and Ipoh. You can read more about him here
The Chinese community continue to grow through the years as more were brought in as work force in the tin mines. Just as the Indians were brought in to work in rubber plantations. Eventually, there were groups of different races occupying certain areas. The Chinese were predominantly involved in businessses and settled mostly in the urban areas, while the Malays were mostly villagers and the Indians in the plantations, some as lawyers and government clerks. For many years there was barely any interaction between these races. It was also the British "divide and conquer" tactic. Only when the different races learn to work together was independence possible. Hence, today, Malaysia is a country made up of different races with different religions and cultures.

#3 Enkidu

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Posted 03 February 2005 - 05:31 AM

The Chinese in Kuala Lumpur are mostly Hakkas. But it is hard to determine accurately, as Chinese people from all over Malaysia come to Kuala Lumpur. But Cantonese is widely spoken in Kuala Lumpur, maybe because the Cantonese used to control most of the shops in Kuala Lumpur. The Hakkas played a large role in opening up Kuala Lumpur in the 1870s and 1880s. Whilst the Hokkiens stayed in Port Klang at the coast, teh Hakka sailed up the Klang River to reach what is now Kuala Lumpur. The Yap Clan (Yue clan) association building (mainly Hakkas) located near Bangkok Bank of Kuala Lumpur has a relatively good record from those early days.

I am not a Hakka, by the way.

#4 handynas

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 05:42 AM

i understand that before the war, there were more chinese in malaya then there are malays, but the great depression see many chinese returned to china. the ex-malaysia PM commented that if there were no great depression, there will be more chinese then malays now, and that chinese will be the predominant political power in Malaysia.

He was making this comment because he want the malay to throw away the laziness in themselves but it makes me think that chinese in malaysia is a very undesirable race, in fact i believe malaysia did not want to have more chinese in malaysia, even though they actively want to get into the good books of china on the other hand. Somehow, I have this feeling that chinese are 2nd class citizens in malaysia - well, maybe that's the case everywhere else, so i shouldn't complain?

#5 Liang Jieming

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 06:14 AM

The were many reasons why the population declined relative to the Malays.

1. immigration from China was curtialed to stop the increase
2. many Chinese were repatriated back to China for either being CPM members or suspected of CPM activities
3. low birthrate compared to the other races
4. many left Malaya to return to China to fight the Japanese on both sides, CCP or KMT
5. many left in the 1950s-60s because of a call from Mao to return and help rebuild China

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 06:53 AM

The were many reasons why the population declined relative to the Malays.

1. immigration from China was curtialed to stop the increase
2. many Chinese were repatriated back to China for either being CPM members or suspected of CPM activities
3. low birthrate compared to the other races
4. many left Malaya to return to China to fight the Japanese on both sides, CCP or KMT
5. many left in the 1950s-60s because of a call from Mao to return and help rebuild China

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what happened to those after a call from Mao and help rebuild China? Were they doing ok?

#7 Liang Jieming

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Posted 10 April 2005 - 09:27 PM

what happened to those after a call from Mao and help rebuild China?  Were they doing ok?

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No much record of what happened to them exist. Firstly there weren't that many of them to start with compared to the population of China. Then during the turmoil of the GLF and the CR, records too were lost but from the sources that I've managed to read, many suffered at the hands of the red guards and during some of the many purges since the loyalty of many of these malaysia-born chinese towards China were suspected coming from overseas and they tended to be intellectuals too instead of the common labourer so they were prosecuted as well by the crazed red guards.

You can read what happened to the CPM members who went back to China either through exile or voluntarily by reading the two books on Chin Peng. As for those who went back independently during the 1950s-60s, not much info can be found.

#8 Hang Li Po

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Posted 14 April 2005 - 12:36 AM

Malaysian Cantonese

This is for those who are interested in learning more about the origin of certain words.

It may shock certain people that certain words they have been using since childhood are actually not cantonese words.

Hokkien words:
------------------

1. "Ka Ki" - should be "Ji Kei" for "ownself" as in "ngo ji kei"

2. "diam" - silent, it should be "on jing".

3. "pai" - number of times, it should be "chi"


Malay word
--------------

1. "Sinang" - twisted version of "Senang" - should be "Yung Yi"

2. "Lui" - chinese version of "Duit" for money - should be "Chin"

3. "Sama" - mispronounciation of "Semua" for all - should be "Chuin Pou"

4. "Pasak" - chinese version of malay word "pasar" for market.
The proper cantonese word for market is "Si Chap", night market is "Yeh Si".

5. "Mata" - old version of malay word "Mata- mata" for police. Should be "Chai Yan" or "King Chak".

English
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Nowadays, those malay educated chinese use a lot of english words (as high as 70%) because their command of the chinese language is poor.
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#9 ckyeah

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Posted 26 April 2005 - 04:25 AM

I think Penang Island is mostly occupied by chinese. if you go there, you will find out that 8 out of 10 is chinese. hokkien is widely use in malaysia, especially in penang, melaka and johor. cantonese is spoken in perak, pahang and kl. the most impressive is chinese from east m'sia, sabah and sarawak, as the know all the dialects, hokkien, cantonese, fuk chow and mandarin.

#10 HaSY

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Posted 27 April 2005 - 07:25 AM

I think Penang Island is mostly occupied by chinese. if you go there, you will find out that 8 out of 10 is chinese. hokkien is widely use in malaysia, especially in penang, melaka and johor. cantonese is spoken in perak, pahang and kl. the most impressive is chinese from east m'sia, sabah and sarawak, as the know all the dialects, hokkien, cantonese, fuk chow and mandarin.

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true...
but most of them are conversing in cantonese,mandarin,hakka.....
I mean East Malaysians
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#11 jiangji

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:13 AM

I think Penang Island is mostly occupied by chinese. if you go there, you will find out that 8 out of 10 is chinese. hokkien is widely use in malaysia, especially in penang, melaka and johor. cantonese is spoken in perak, pahang and kl. the most impressive is chinese from east m'sia, sabah and sarawak, as the know all the dialects, hokkien, cantonese, fuk chow and mandarin.


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About 30% of population in East Malaysia was chinese. Most of them live in the cities while the rest of ethic groups mostly live in countryside. So, basically the economy was run by the chinese.

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Edited by jiangji, 04 July 2005 - 10:17 AM.

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#12 nguoiVietchanhtong

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:18 AM

Yap Clan (Yue clan) association building (mainly Hakkas) located near Bangkok Bank of Kuala Lumpur has a relatively good record from those early days.

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What do you mean by Yue clan? I thought Cantonese people are Chinese

#13 jiangji

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:22 AM

What do you mean by Yue clan?  I thought Cantonese people are Chinese

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Clan means "group of people related by blood or marriage" which is a different meaning from ethnic groups which "relating to people grouped according to a common racial, national, tribal, religious, linguistic, or cultural origin".

Edited by jiangji, 04 July 2005 - 10:23 AM.

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#14 Liang Jieming

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:08 PM

true...
but most of them are conversing in cantonese,mandarin,hakka.....
I mean East Malaysians

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KK actually has a slight chinese majority if I'm not mistaken.

#15 jiangji

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Posted 04 July 2005 - 10:24 PM

KK actually has a slight chinese majority if I'm not mistaken.

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I don't think so. The city has a population composed of three distinct ethnic groups, 20 percent Chinese, 30 percent Malay and 50 percent of indigenous origins. However, majority of the population in Kuching are chinese.

Edited by jiangji, 04 July 2005 - 10:34 PM.

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