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Translation of Chinese name to Hokkien speech


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#1 Tjong Hi

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 08:52 AM

Hi There,

My name is Tjong Hi Oei and my grantparents and parents migrated from China ( location somewhere in Hokkien (Fujian) to Indonesia, Papoea New Genuia to the netherlands.

Unfortunatly important information has been lost like the exact location in china as the family poem to indicate the chinese names for new generations has been lost forever.

As my wife is expecting our baby we would like to give it a chinese name although this is not the official family name. We have the name in Cantonese speech: Hong Kin and we would like to translate it into Hokkien Speech to have at least this connection to our roots.

Is there someone of you able to translate this name, attached the chinese characters,



I would be very gratefull for all the help we can get.

Many thanks!

Oei Tjong Hi

#2 Yun

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 09:57 AM

In Hokkien, it would be Kong Kian. I noticed that your attachment is titled 'Khong Kien', so was that your guess for how the name would sound in Hokkien? If so, your guess is correct.
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#3 qrasy

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Posted 10 November 2006 - 12:14 PM

The K in "康" is aspirated just like in 區...
So, in Singapore, is it common to write it just "k"?

Is "-ian" or "-ien" the standard spelling for that ending? I notice that usually it's "kien" in the case of 福建. Or does that depend on which Hokkien?
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#4 xng

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Posted 12 November 2006 - 10:35 AM

It is not 'Kong Kien'. If you use 'Kin' (instead of Gin) for cantonese, then you must use either

K' or Kh to distinguish this K from the other K.

Anyway, the dutch people can't distinguish these 2 sounds.

So the final answer is

K'ong Kien.

Edited by xng, 12 November 2006 - 10:37 AM.


#5 Tjong Hi

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Posted 15 November 2006 - 05:04 PM

Thank you very much for your reply's.

I got a translation from someone else that say's it should be Khong Kien, but he said me to check it on the forum to be sure.
After reading the last message I believe he was right and is it all so correct to wright the name like this.

Edited by General_Zhaoyun, 16 September 2008 - 01:39 AM.


#6 kayuputih

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Posted 27 August 2008 - 11:58 PM

Hi, i'm new here...this is my first post.

i'm very glad that could find this forum. i search in google for keyword "chinese to hokkien translate tool" and found this forum instead....
i'm currently doing summary for hokkien series (with mandarin subtitle), but even i hear again n again, i cant catch their name in hokkien.
please someone kindly hearted to convert it these list of name in hokkien:

1.周素珍 =
2.陈雅雯 =
3.刘德慧 =
4.高大力 =
5.方建州 =
6.张晓芳 =
7.关苇苇 =
8.关坤成 =
9.林云龙 =
10.陈瑞清 =
11.刘本木 =
12.张阿树 =
13.方国强 =
14.何淑卿 =
15.刘月梅 =
16.曾宝珠 =
17.王丽玲 =
18.黄秀兰 =
19.李正豪 =

#7 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 01:15 AM

Hi, i'm new here...this is my first post.

i'm very glad that could find this forum. i search in google for keyword "chinese to hokkien translate tool" and found this forum instead....
i'm currently doing summary for hokkien series (with mandarin subtitle), but even i hear again n again, i cant catch their name in hokkien.
please someone kindly hearted to convert it these list of name in hokkien:


I'm using Pumindian romanization (improvised by PRC)

1.周素珍 = Ziu So Din
2.陈雅雯 = Dan Nga Mun
3.刘德慧 = Lao Diak Hui
4.高大力 = Gou Dai Lat
5.方建州 = Hong Gian Ziu
6.张晓芳 = Diu Hiao Hong
7.关苇苇 = Guan Ui Ui
8.关坤成 = Guan Kun Sing
9.林云龙 = Lim Hun Ling
10.陈瑞清 = Dan Sui Cing
11.刘本木 = Lao Bun Mok
12.张阿树 = Diu A Ciu
13.方国强 = Hong Gok Giong
14.何淑卿 = Hou Siok King
15.刘月梅 = Lao Nge Mui
16.曾宝珠 = Zan Bou Zu
17.王丽玲 = Ong Le Ling
18.黄秀兰 = Ng Siu Lan
19.李正豪 = Li Zing Hou
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#8 kayuputih

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 03:38 AM

Thanks very much General Zhaoyun..
it really helps me a lot...
actually, is hokkien only improvised by Pumingdian romanization?
is there any manual or something that i can use in future development?
because i'm afraid i will bother u with these chinese-hokkian translation...

upss..sori, i need 3 more hokkien for these 3 names:

关明杰 =
陈雅雯 =
林志宏 =

thanks a lot

I'm using Pumingdian romanization (improvised by PRC)


Edited by kayuputih, 28 August 2008 - 03:59 AM.


#9 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 03:59 AM

Thanks very much General Zhaoyun..
it really helps me a lot...
actually, is hokkien only improvised by Pumingdian romanization?
is there a manual or something that i can use in future development?


There is currently no worldwide 'Romanization standard' for Hokkien.

Pumindian 普闽典 romanization (for Hokkien) was developed by PRC in 1982. It is a little abit similar to pinyin (for Mandarin). Personally, I find it easier to pronounce Hokkien words using Pumindian method, since I already know Pinyin. It's currently used by Hokkien scholars from PRC.

On the other hand, Hokkien scholars from Taiwan or the West generally preferred to use Peh Oe Ji (白话字) or simply "POJ" romanization method, which was an older romanization technique developed by European Missionaries in 19th century. See http://en.wikipedia....i/Pe̍h-ōe-jī .

Peh Oe Ji seems to have the greatest influence in the Hokkien romanization, although I find it rather complicated to learn or read it.

Do check out the Hokkien Wikipedia (holopedia) at http://zh-min-nan.wi...iki/Thâu-ia̍h. The Hokkien is written using Peh Oe Ji romanization

There are other romanization methods developed by Hokkien Scholars in Taiwan. See http://tailingua.com...pts/compare.htm for comparison of various romanization methods.
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#10 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 04:04 AM

Thanks very much General Zhaoyun..
it really helps me a lot...
actually, is hokkien only improvised by Pumingdian romanization?
is there any manual or something that i can use in future development?
because i'm afraid i will bother u with these chinese-hokkian translation...

upss..sori, i need 3 more hokkien for these 3 names:



关明杰 = Guan Ming Giat
陈雅雯 = Dan Nga Mun
林志宏 = Lim Zi Hing
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#11 kayuputih

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 09:49 PM

the last one, need hokkien for this:

张子良 =

There is currently no worldwide 'Romanization standard' for Hokkien.
Peh Oe Ji seems to have the greatest influence in the Hokkien romanization, although I find it rather complicated to learn or read it.


yes i search at google with keyword "list of hokkien surname in taiwan" and come up with various language version including peh oh ji version. and i prefer those POJ vers. I'm from Indonesia, and mostly wu xia writer in Indonesia wrote their cast/role with POJ version, so yesterday i kind of surprise when you convert the hokkien name is not same with mine.

There are other romanization methods developed by Hokkien Scholars in Taiwan. See http://tailingua.com...pts/compare.htm for comparison of various romanization methods.

thanks a lot..i'm surely need those.

Edited by kayuputih, 28 August 2008 - 10:14 PM.


#12 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 28 August 2008 - 10:34 PM

the last one, need hokkien for this:



张子良 = Diu Zy Liong
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#13 kayuputih

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 08:39 AM

hi its me again....

my friend and i discuss about character 'Wo / 我' (in mandarin) whether (in hokkien) pronounce it as 'Gua' or 'Wa'
which one is correct to pronounce 我 in hokkien? 'Gua' or 'Wa'...?

another that make me confusing, need ur opinion regarding this:
logically if there are 3 words in mandarin, if those are converted to hokkien there will be 3 word in hokkien to, right?

but i found that not always true, such as:
对不起 (dui bu qi) ---> 3 words in mandarin, means: sorry
but if we converted 对不起 to hokkien, it will be only 2 words: 'Xi Le' (xi le or xi de ...?)

another example:
不用 (bu yong) --> 2 words in mandarin, means: need not
but if we converted 不用 to hokkien, it will be only 1 words: 'bien'

is that true?
i only count on my ears to hear all hokkien conversation while my eyes read it in chinese character.

so...need your explanation for this.
thanks

Edited by kayuputih, 08 September 2008 - 08:44 AM.


#14 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 08 September 2008 - 09:07 AM

hi its me again....

my friend and i discuss about character 'Wo / 我' (in mandarin) whether (in hokkien) pronounce it as 'Gua' or 'Wa'
which one is correct to pronounce 我 in hokkien? 'Gua' or 'Wa'...?


我 should be "Ngua" or "Goa" (Gua) in Hokkien, not "Wa". There should be a "G". It's just that sometimes "G" is very lightly pronounced and often disappeared in many speech that people mistook it to be "Wa".

another that make me confusing, need ur opinion regarding this:
logically if there are 3 words in mandarin, if those are converted to hokkien there will be 3 word in hokkien to, right?

but i found that not always true, such as:
对不起 (dui bu qi) ---> 3 words in mandarin, means: sorry
but if we converted 对不起 to hokkien, it will be only 2 words: 'Xi Le' (xi le or xi de ...?)


In Hokkien, "对不起 tui put khi " is used as a verb as in "我对不起你 Goa tui put khi li" (I've wronged you).

In spoken Hokkien, the common way of saying "I'm sorry" is "Sit Le". The correct chinese character for "Sit Le" is 失礼
Thus, "Sit Le 失礼 " (or Xi Le") is sorry in Hokkien.

another example:
不用 (bu yong) --> 2 words in mandarin, means: need not
but if we converted 不用 to hokkien, it will be only 1 words: 'bien'



不用 (bu yong) is Mandarin word of saying "need not" or "no need to".

Hokkien way of saying "no need to" is "bian 免" or "mian"。 bian 免 can also mean "no" as in "bian kia 免惊" ('不用怕 ' in Mandarin - or "no fear"). Sometimes, "不免" (m bian or "no need to") is also used.
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#15 xng

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Posted 09 September 2008 - 07:41 AM

hi its me again....

my friend and i discuss about character 'Wo / 我' (in mandarin) whether (in hokkien) pronounce it as 'Gua' or 'Wa'
which one is correct to pronounce 我 in hokkien? 'Gua' or 'Wa'...?

another that make me confusing, need ur opinion regarding this:
logically if there are 3 words in mandarin, if those are converted to hokkien there will be 3 word in hokkien to, right?

but i found that not always true, such as:
对不起 (dui bu qi) ---> 3 words in mandarin, means: sorry
but if we converted 对不起 to hokkien, it will be only 2 words: 'Xi Le' (xi le or xi de ...?)

another example:
不用 (bu yong) --> 2 words in mandarin, means: need not
but if we converted 不用 to hokkien, it will be only 1 words: 'bien'

is that true?
i only count on my ears to hear all hokkien conversation while my eyes read it in chinese character.

so...need your explanation for this.
thanks



All Hokkien words doesn't have the 'W' consonant. So it is 'Gua'.

Hokkien uses different words than mandarin. You can't translate one by one all the words only most words.




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