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Malay language (Bahasa Melayu)


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#1 Hang Li Po

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 10:01 AM

Irans And Malay Archipelago Connections



Ties That Bind: Iran's Archipelago Connections

Mohammad Khoush Heikal Azad, Jakarta

Iranians have a very long acquaintance with the Malay people, based on evidence from historical documents, myths and gravestones.

Before accepting Islam, Iranians were doing vast amounts of trade with China. They also had trade and cultural relations with the Malay archipelago as a bridge between the West (Roman Empire) and the East (China) along two routes: the overland "Silk Road" and the oceanic "Spice Road". These relations date back to the Ashkanian Dynasty in 200 BC.

After the arrival of Islam and also the migration of Iranian groups from South China, Iranian businessmen and clergymen continued their presence in order to trade and to propagate Islam.

A study of the similarities between the Malay and Persian languages yields very interesting results.

There are more than 350 Persian words which have become part of the Malay language. A partial list includes: agar-agar, ustad, baju, bahari, bandar, bau, bius, babu, piala, peci, tambur, tembakau, taman, dewan, domba, saudagar, syal, firman, kiai, anggur, Syahbandar, istana, bazaar, bocah, jam, tong, bumi, pahlawan, bumi, bandar, bedebah, pelita, tahta, tamasya, tekan, kurma, daftar, babu, penjarah, johan, cara, arah, rawan, serban, sudah, seruni, firdaus, kenari, kawin, karya, kecil, kismis, gusti, kata, kuno, gandum, goni, langgar, lengan, marmer, medan, mas, mitra, nama, nenek.

I found that the majority of these words are nouns, especially single nouns, followed in frequency by adjectives. Later I classified the words into 29 groups, including human attitudes, moral and family relations (40 words); parts of the body and clothes (28 words); foods, fruits and beverages (25 words); religion (23 words); home and related concepts (21 words); king and related concepts (20 words); flowers and plants (20 words); commerce and accounting (18 words); and military and related concepts (17 words).

Many of these words did not undergo changes in their meanings or pronunciations, while some underwent changes to their spellings and phonetics without altering their meanings. Others experienced drastic spelling changes and can be hardly recognized, or got completely new meanings.

I found that more than 283 Persian words exist in the Malay language without any basic change in meaning. This suggests a very close relationship between the Iranian and Malay people in earlier days.

In addition, more than 50 Malay names have been identified as Persian names. Many Iranian names for people and places are traceable back to ancient Iran. Some of these names are alive today in the Malay Archipelago even though they are no longer used in Iran. Examples include Zal, Buzurjamir, Shahrezad, Johansyah and Firmansyah.

The Persian language's influence on Malay and some of its grammatical aspects shows the surprising, indirect influence of Persian on Malay's adopted Arabic, Turkish, and Sanskrit words. Because of their long use in the Persian language, some Arabic words in Malay can be considered Persian words, such as arak, atar, bahlul, bait, serbat, dalal, dayus, dukan, gogah, hamam, inai, khanjar, kisa, komkoma, mamlakat, masnawi, maus, menara, nagara (nakora), panus, ratna (rakna), jahanam, topan (taufan), uktab, ujrat, and waswas. The existence of 280 Arabic words which have become Persian words indicates these words were transferred by Iran to the archipelago.

There's a well-known proverb that says, tak kenal maka tak sayang (if we don't know each other, we won't love each other). If we get to know each other, and have a dialog about culture and civilization emphasizing the mutual relations among these countries, it can become the preface to a closer friendship.

The writer is Deputy Ambassador of the Islamic Republic of Iran to Indonesia. His book Persian Vocabularies into Malay Language was published by the Ministry of Culture of Iran.

-Jakarta Post-
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#2 Hang Li Po

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 10:04 AM

Borrowed Words


The Malay language has many words borrowed from Arabic (mainly religious terms), Hindustani, Sanskrit, Tamil, Persian, Portuguese, Dutch, certain Chinese dialects and more recently, English (in particular many scientific and technological terms). Some examples follow:

* aksi - action (from Dutch actie)
* almari - cupboard (from Portuguese armário)
* anggur - grape (from Persian انگور/angur)
* bahasa - language (from Sanskrit bhāshā)
* bandar - town (from Persian بندر/bandr)
* bangku - stool (from Portuguese banco)
* bendera - flag (from Portuguese bandeira)
* bihun - rice vermicelli (from Hokkien bi-hun)
* biola - violin (from Portuguese viola)
* biskut - biscuit (from English)
* bomba - fire brigade (from Portuguese bomba, "pump", or bombeiro, "fireman", lit. "pumper")
* boneka - doll (from Portuguese boneca)
* buat - do (from Sanskrit wuat)
* buku - book (from Dutch boek)
* bumi - earth (from Sanskrit bhumi)
* cawan - cup (from Mandarin cháwǎn)
* dakwah - sermon (from Arabic da3wah)
* dewan - hall (from Persian دیوان/diwan)
* duka - sadness (from Sanskrit duhkha)
* dunia - world (from Arabic dunyā)
* falsafah - philosophy (from Arabic falsafah)
* gandum - wheat (from Persian گندمGandm)
* garfu - fork (from Portuguese garfo)
* gereja - church (from Portuguese igreja)
* gratis - for free (from Portuguese)
* guru - teacher (from Sanskrit)
* had - limit (from Arabic hadd)
* huruf - word character/letter (from Arabic ḥurūf)
* ini - this (from Persian این)
* jawab - to answer (from Arabic jawāB)
* jendela - window (from Portuguese janela)
* Khamis - Thursday (Arabic al-khamis)
* kamus - dictionary (from Arabic qāmūs)
* kapal - ship (from Tamil kappal)
* katil - bed (from Tamil kattil)
* kaunter - counter or desk (from English)
* keju - cheese (from Portuguese queijo)
* kemeja - shirt (from Portuguese camisa)
* kepala - head (from Sanskrit kapala "skull")
* kereta - carriage, car (from Portuguese carreta)
* komputer - computer (from English)
* kongsi - share (from Hokkien kong-si 公司)
* kuda - horse (from Hindustani kudh)
* kurma - date (from Persian خرما/Khurma)
* limau - lemon/orange (from Portuguese limão "lemon")
* maaf - sorry (from Hindustani māf "forgiveness")/(from Arabic Ma3fu
* maha - great (from Sanskrit)
* makmal - laboratory Arabic
* mangga - mango (from Portuguese manga)
* manusia - human being (from Sanskrit manuṣya)
* mentega - butter (from Portuguese manteiga)
* mee/mi - noodles (from Hokkien miᴺ)
* meja - table (from Portuguese mesa)
* misai - moustache (from Tamil meesai)
* miskin - poor (from Arabic miskiin)
* muflis - bankrupt (from Arabic muflis)
* nujum - astrologer (from Arabic al-nujum)
* nanas/nenas - pineapple (from Portuguese or Arabic ananás)
* paderi - priest (Christian) (from Portuguese padre)
* pau - bun (from Hokkien pau 包)
* pesta - party (from Portuguese festa)
* pita - tape (from Portuguese fita)
* putera - prince (from Sanskrit putra "son")
* raja - king (from Sanskrit rāja)
* roda - wheel (from Portuguese roda)
* roti - bread (from Sanskrit roṭi)
* sabun - soap (from Arabic) sàbuun
* sains - science (from English)
* sama - same (from Sanskrit)
o sama-sama - together (derived from loanword sama via reduplication)
* sekolah - school (from Portuguese escola)
* sengsara - suffering (from Sanskrit saṃsara)
* sepatu - shoe (from Portuguese sapato)
* soldadu - soldier (from Portuguese soldado)
* syariah - Islamic law (from Arabic shāri`ah)
* syukur - thankful (from Arabic shukr)
* sistem - system (from English)
* suka - happiness (from Sanskrit sukha)
* tangki - tank (from Portuguese tanque)
* tauhu - beancurd (from Hokkien tao-hu)
* tarikh - date (from Arabic tārīkh)
* teh - tea (from Hokkien tɛ)
* teko - teapot (from Hokkien tɛ-ko)
* televisyen - television (from English)
* tuala - towel (from Portuguese toalha)
* tukar - to exchange (from Portuguese trocar)
* unta - camel (from Hindustani ūnṭ)
* utara - north (from Sanskrit uttara)
* waktu - time (from Arabic waqt)
* zirafah - giraffe (from Arabic zirāfah)


Some Malay words have been borrowed into English. See the list of words of Malay origin at Wiktionary, the free dictionary and Wikipedia's sister project.

Malay language has also heavily influenced the forms of colloquial English spoken in Malaysia (Manglish).
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#3 Hang Li Po

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Posted 04 July 2007 - 10:42 AM

Aksara Rencong Alphabet

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Aksara Kaganga Alphabet

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Palava Alphabet

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Kawi Alphabet

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Jawi Alphabet

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Edited by Hang Li Po, 12 May 2010 - 01:22 AM.

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#4 Hang Li Po

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 09:43 AM

TRACING THE ORIGINS OF THE JAWI SCRIPT

The Jawi letters have been in existence in the Malay archipelago for centuries. It shares a strong bond with the Arabic script, which made its way to the Malay archipelago together with Islam, disseminated by Muslim traders and missionaries of Arab, Indian and Chinese origins in the 7th century.

Prior to the Arabic script, the Malays were using the "rencong (sharp-pointed) script" written on bamboo stems and leaves. This was followed by the "kawi" and "palava" writings, both of Indian origin.

With the coming of Islam, the Malays tried to use the palava or kawi characters to write about Islam, but both were unsuitable as they could not properly pronounce the verses of the Quran and Hadis.

"The situation prompted the Malays to experiment with Arabic characters. Hence, the Jawi script is truly the creation of the Malays even though it is based on the Arabic script," said Dr Hashim Musa, former lecturer with Universiti Malaya's Malay Studies Academy who has written a book, "The History of the Development of the Jawi Script".

He said the Malays eventually included several letters to conform with the Malay syllables, which are 'che', 'nge', 'pa', 'ge' and 'nye'. The letter 'vi' was later introduced in the 1990's by the Malay language custodian, Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka.

The earliest evidence of the existence of the Jawi script was the discovery of inscriptions on a stone dated 702H (1303 AD) and according to Hashim, Sanskrit words could still be seen on the inscribed stone.

But the modern day Jawi script is due to the initiative taken to systematise the Jawi script by none other than Zainal Abidin Ahmad, the leading Malay literary figure or better known as Pendeta Za'ba, who produced the "Daftar Ejaan Melayu Jawi-Rumi" (Jawi-Roman Spelling Register), which he worked on in 1938 and only printed in 1949.

-BERNAMA-
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#5 Monkey-King

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Posted 25 July 2007 - 10:51 AM

Absolutely fascinating post. Thanks for taking the time. Much appreciated.

*runs off to devour the information provided! :P

#6 sg_han

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Posted 19 August 2007 - 10:57 PM

i wonder if you are a chinese or malay.
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#7 Hang Li Po

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 10:37 AM

i wonder if you are a chinese or malay.



Mixed :rolleyes:
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#8 Hang Li Po

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 10:52 AM

Bahasa Indonesia


Indonesian (Bahasa Indonesia) is the official language of Indonesia. Indonesian is a standardised dialect of the Malay language that was officially defined with the declaration of Indonesia's independence in 1945. The Malaysian and Indonesian languages remain quite similar.

Indonesia is the fourth most populous nation in the world. Of its large population the number of people who fluently speak Indonesian is fast approaching 100%, thus making Indonesian one of the most widely spoken languages in the world. Most Indonesians, aside from speaking the national language, are often fluent in another regional language or local dialect (examples include Minangkabau, Sundanese and Javanese) which are commonly used at home and within the local community. Most formal education, as well as nearly all national media and other forms of communication, are conducted in Indonesian. In East Timor, occupied by Indonesia from 1974 to 1999, the Indonesian language is recognised by the constitution as one of the two working languages (the other is English, alongside the official languages of Tetum and Portuguese).

The Indonesian name for the language is Bahasa Indonesia (lit. "the language of Indonesia"). In the same way that English speakers would refer to the official language of France as "French" (not Français), the most accurate way of referring to Indonesia's national language in English is "Indonesian". However, the foreign term Bahasa Indonesia can sometimes still be found in written or spoken English. In addition, the language is sometimes referred to as "Bahasa" by English-speakers, though this simply means "language" and thus is also not an official term for the Indonesian language.


Indonesian is a normative form of the Malay language, an Austronesian (or Malayo-Polynesian) language which has been used as a lingua franca in the Indonesian archipelago for centuries. It was elevated to the status of official language with the Indonesian declaration of independence in 1945, drawing inspiration from the Sumpah Pemuda (Youth's Oath) event in 1928.

Because of its origins, Indonesian (in its most standard form) is mutually intelligible with the official Malaysian form of Malay. However, it does differ from Malaysian in some aspects, with differences in pronunciation and vocabulary. These differences are mainly due to the Dutch and Javanese influences on Indonesian.

Whilst Indonesian is spoken as a mother tongue (first language) by only a small proportion of Indonesia's large population (i.e. mainly those who reside within the vicinity of Jakarta), over 200 million people regularly make use of the national language - some with varying degrees of proficiency. In a nation which boasts more than 300 native languages and a vast array of ethnic groups, the use of proper or 'good and correct' Indonesian (as opposed to Indonesian slang or regional dialects) is an essential means of communication across the archipelago. Use of the national language is abundant in the media, government bodies, schools, universities, workplaces, amongst members of the Indonesian upper-class or nobility and also in many other formal situations.

Most native speakers of Indonesian would agree that the standard, correct version of the Indonesian language is rarely used in daily communication. One can find standard and correct Indonesian in books and newspapers, or listen to it when watching the news or television/radio broadcasts, but few native Indonesian speakers use formally correct language in their daily conversations. While this is a phenomenon common to most languages in the world (for example, spoken English does not always correspond to written standards), the degree of "correctness" of spoken Indonesian (in terms of grammar and vocabulary) by comparison to its written form is noticeably low. This is mostly due to the fact that most Indonesians tend to combine certain aspects of their own local languages (eg. Javanese, Sundanese, Balinese, and even Chinese dialects, particularly Hokkien) with Indonesian. The result is the creation of various types of 'regional' Indonesian, the very types that a foreigner is most likely to hear upon arriving in any Indonesian city or town. This phenomenon is exacerbated by the use of Indonesian slang, particularly in the cities. A classic example of a speaker of accented Indonesian is former president Soeharto, whose Javanese accent came through whenever he delivered a speech.

The Dutch colonisation left an imprint on the Indonesian language that can be seen in words such as polisi (police), kualitas/kwaliteit (quality), wortel (carrot), kamar (room, chamber), rokok (cigarette), korupsi (corruption), persneling (gear), kantor (office), and resleting (zipper). Alongside Malay, Portuguese was the lingua franca for trade throughout the archipelago from the sixteenth century through to the early nineteenth century. Indonesian words derived from Portuguese include sabun (soap), meja (table), boneka (doll), jendela (window), gereja (church), bendera (flag) and Minggu (from domingo = Sunday).[6] Some of the many words of Chinese origin (presented here with accompanying Hokkien/ Mandarin pronunciation derivatives as well as traditional and simplified characters) include pisau (匕首 bǐshǒu - knife), loteng, (楼/层 = lóu/céng - [upper] floor/ level), mie (麵 > 面 mi'àn - noodles), lumpia (潤餅 (Hokkien = lūn-piáⁿ) - springroll), cawan, (茶碗 cháwǎn - teacup), teko (茶壺 > 茶壶 = cháhú [Mandarin], teh-ko [Hokkien] = teapot) and even the widely used slang terms gua and lu (from the Hokkien 'goa' 我 and 'lu/li' 你 - meaning 'you' and 'I/ me'). From Sanskrit came words such as kaca (glass, mirror), raja (king), manusia (mankind) b(h)umi/ dunia (earth/ world) and agama (religion). Words of Arabic origin include k(h)abar (news), selamat/ salam (a greeting) and kamus (dictionary). There are also words derived from Javanese, e.g. aku (meaning I/ me (informal) and its derivative form, mengaku (to admit or confess).
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#9 LYY

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Posted 20 August 2007 - 08:48 PM

Mixed :rolleyes:


Are you been treated as a Malay by your surrounding friends?

#10 sg_han

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 06:43 AM

Mixed :rolleyes:

yup i know,. but one thing is for sure. you identify more with being a malay muslim than that of a chinese
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#11 Hang Li Po

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Posted 21 August 2007 - 09:30 PM

Malay Language Malay Identity


Md. Asham B. Ahmad
Fellow

08/08/2007 |

A compromise is a situation where someone accepts something slightly different from what that person really wants, because of circumstances or because they have taken into account the wishes of other people.

Any human dealing will usually involve a compromise. However not every compromise is acceptable.

What about the decision to change the name 'Bahasa Melayu' to 'Bahasa Malaysia', citing national unity as its motive: is it another compromise? If so, is it an acceptable compromise? And what is actually being compromised?

Language, it is said, is the soul of a nation (Bahasa Jiwa Bangsa). It is the vehicle of the mind, through which humans express their thoughts and feelings. 'Bahasa Melayu', in this regard, is the soul of 'Bangsa Melayu' (the Malays).

That being the case, the notion 'Bahasa Malaysia' becomes problematic , to say the least. 'Bahasa Malaysia' is supposedly the soul of 'Bangsa Malaysia' (Malaysian). But the term ‘Malaysian' indicates citizenship, not nationhood. A Malaysian could be a Malay, an Indian, a Chinese, or anybody. The Malaysians, taken together, could hardly form a nation with a soul unless we can accept the idea of a soulless nation, or a nation that is still searching for a soul. In short there is no ‘Bahasa Malaysia' unless one believes that there is a nation called ‘Malaysian' (Bangsa Malaysia).

In term of time, fifty years of independence is insufficient time in order to have a distinct nationhood. The Malaysians are divided into different races. They profess different religions and speak different languages. They do not share a common historical and political destiny. These are the undeniable ‘hard facts'. These particular ‘facts' they are value dependent, meaning with wisdom these facts could be either a blessing, or a recipe for disaster. Hence the talk about national unity.

Malaysian unity must be conceived without ignoring these facts. We must admit that it takes a very long time to forge a common historical and political destiny among the various races. It is also impossible to force inter-marriage among its people in order to create a new race, just as it is impossible to impose a common religion. What could be done with 'relative ease' and without creating difficult controversy is to agree on having a national language. One may use a language other than one's mother tongue without having to change one's cultural identity.

The justification for choosing Bahasa Melayu as the national language is all too obvious but it is not so with the justification for changing the name to Bahasa Malaysia.

Does this mean that the non-Malays refused to accept Bahasa Melayu as the National Language unless the name is changed to Bahasa Malaysia? If that is really the case we must demand reason and explanation for: (i) the refusal to accept Bahasa Melayu, and (2) how the change could foster unity? Had English been chosen as the national language, would there have been suggestions to change the designation to Bahasa Malaysia as well?

To a discerning Malay the compromise is not just a matter of naming.

When we say Bahasa Melayu is the soul of the Malays, we mean it is the language where their identity as Muslims lies. The Malay language belongs to the family of Islamic languages. It is the language through which the Malays were islamized. To preserve its purity and to protect it from corruption is a matter of preserving and protecting the Malay identity itself, its culture and civilization, which is deeply entrenched in religion. It is a matter of trust and responsibility, and only the Malays themselves would have all the reasons to shoulder that trust and fulfill that responsibility.

Thus renaming 'Bahasa Melayu' 'Bahasa Malaysia' may be construed as transferring that trust and responsibility to 'Bangsa Malaysia'. Can 'Bangsa Malaysia', which is still in search of an identity, be given such a responsibility? So why do it in the first place?

Bahasa Melayu has existed long before the existence of an entity we call Malaysia. By renaming it Bahasa Malaysia the language will be severed from its long history, and that will ultimately change its character.

Let us not forget that the Malays are Muslims first and foremost. A developed Malay nation is one that has a clear identity and is fully conscious of its destiny. A truly developed Malay nation within a developed Malaysia is not one that would continuously compromise until it loses its identity and forgets its destiny. The compromise to rename 'Bahasa Melayu' 'Bahasa Malaysia' is, as far as the Malays are concerned, not a positive development but a backward move. It is akin to forsaking their identity for something vague, uncertain, and confusing.

It is true that the decision has already been made. But an erroneous and unscrupulous decision has to be challeged regardless if it were carved in stone. The decision could have been made by a group of individuals who are in reality culturally illiterate, who think that there is nothing higher than national interest.

It takes wisdom and courage to question a decision. A thinking human being wants to be convinced that the decision is right. By 'right' we mean the decision must be justified by sound reason.

The Malays, it would appear, are simply told by their leaders to accept the decision and to keep quiet. It is as if they have been told that to accept any decision made by the people in power is a virtue, and to question it is a vice. They are expected to emulate Hang Tuah, the loyal servant of the king, and to avoid behaving like Hang Jebat, the villain, the traitor. Are Hang Tuah and Hang Jebat really heroes? Islam has taught the Malays rationality and moderation: Hang Tuah and Hang Jebat were neither rational, nor moderate. Their stories reflect extremes. Therefore, should the Malays be made to emulate either one?
TOO PHAT feat YASIN - ALHAMDULILLAH (ENGLISH VERSION)


#12 sg_han

sg_han

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 07:56 AM

.

Let us not forget that the Malays are Muslims first and foremost.


Don't EQUATE Malay with Islam. While Islam might be the most followed religion of the Malays, There exist Malay Buddhists Hindus and Christians and you can't doubt that they are Malays, If the Malays were to further islaminise and completely eliminate all their Buddhist/Hindu past, they can soon change their race to Arab.

Stop acting like a Malay.:s Maybe islamonline.net is more suitable for you instead.
大韓民國의國歌-愛國歌

#13 Hang Li Po

Hang Li Po

    State Undersecretary (Shangshu Lang 尚书郎)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
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  • Location:Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)
  • Languages spoken:Bahasa Melayu, English
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Malaysian
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Asian History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Malai Ren, Malai Yun, Mo-lo-yu, Molo-yoou, Mali-yu-eul, Ma-lo-yu, Mo Lou Yu, Mo Lo Yu, Mo Lou Y, Mo Lou Yuu, Ma Li Yi Er, Ma La Yu, Wu Lai Yu & Wu Lai Yu, Malaysian History, Islamic History, Chinese Muslim History, Japanese Muslim History

Posted 25 August 2007 - 04:54 AM

Don't EQUATE Malay with Islam. While Islam might be the most followed religion of the Malays, There exist Malay Buddhists Hindus and Christians and you can't doubt that they are Malays, If the Malays were to further islaminise and completely eliminate all their Buddhist/Hindu past, they can soon change their race to Arab.

Stop acting like a Malay.:s Maybe islamonline.net is more suitable for you instead.



I am proud to be a Malaysian Muslim


Actually, I’m not into this racial pride thing. Being Malay, Chinese or Indian is not really important. What matters is how you conduct yourself and what you contribute to society. And I’m not saying that just to get on everyone’s good side. Haha. But honestly, I am Muslim first and I am Malay and Chinese second

“The Almighty Allah has removed the false pride taking, which was practiced in the pre-Islamic period, where individuals took false pride with their ancestors (forefathers). All mankind belong (in lineage) to Adam (pbuh). Adam is created of soil (earth dirt).”

Edited by Hang Li Po, 25 August 2007 - 04:58 AM.

TOO PHAT feat YASIN - ALHAMDULILLAH (ENGLISH VERSION)


#14 Hang Li Po

Hang Li Po

    State Undersecretary (Shangshu Lang 尚书郎)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 677 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)
  • Languages spoken:Bahasa Melayu, English
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Malaysian
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Asian History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Malai Ren, Malai Yun, Mo-lo-yu, Molo-yoou, Mali-yu-eul, Ma-lo-yu, Mo Lou Yu, Mo Lo Yu, Mo Lou Y, Mo Lou Yuu, Ma Li Yi Er, Ma La Yu, Wu Lai Yu & Wu Lai Yu, Malaysian History, Islamic History, Chinese Muslim History, Japanese Muslim History

Posted 26 August 2007 - 07:51 AM

Posted Image


Add Dictionaries of Your Choice

E-kamus comes along with another CD that provides a list of 12 dictionaries, namely:

* English-Malay ( Times)
* Istilah Matematik (DBP)
* Kamus Dewan Edisi Ketiga (DBP)
* Kamus Inggeris-Melayu (DBP)
* Istilah Kejuteraan(DBP)
* Istilah Komputer(DBP)
* Istilah Sains(DBP)
* Melayu-Inggeris (KM)
* English Oxford
* Dictionary of Medicine
* Dictionary of Computer
* English Peter Collin


http://www.e-kamus-malaysia.com/



Posted Image


Posted Image


New features in version 1.5

* Malay Chinese Dictionary. Contains more than 30,000 entries. Supports Malay and Chinese two-way checking. This is a free update for our existing Dewan Eja Pro and Kamus Pro users.
* Dewan Eja for MS Office 2007. Dewan Eja now integrates fully into MS Office 2007, using the new Ribbon interface. Customers who purchased Dewan Eja or Dewan Eja Pro from Nov 1, 2006 are entitled for a free upgrade. Customers who purchased Dewan Eja or Dewan Eja Pro before Nov 1, 2006 can upgrade for RM30.00. Call us at 03-83193388 to acquire your upgrade serial number.

To download the Malay Chinese Dictionary, click here. To download Dewan Eja 2007, click here.

Not only does it contain the acclaimed Dewan Eja spell checker, it also features a full suite of Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka (DBP) dictionaries, including

* Kamus Dewan Edisi Keempat. A Malay-to-Malay dictionary that consists of over 49,000 entries.
* Kamus Inggeris Melayu Dewan. An English-to-Malay dictionary that consists of over 47,000 entries.
* Daftar Istlah. Cross-reference between English and Malay terms in various fields, including science and mathematics. It consists of over 267,000 entries.

Key Features

* Spell checker for Malay. Dewan Eja underlines spelling mistakes in MS Office automatically.
* CheckAnywhere technology lets you highlight any word in any Windows application to check for reference intuitively. You need not re-type or copy and paste at all.
* Best dictionaries, officially provided by Dewan Bahasa dan Pustaka.
* new! Kamus Peribahasa Simpulan Bahasa (trial version), based on Kamus Peribahasa Kontemporari and Kamus Simpulan Bahasa published by PTS. It contains more than 28,000 entries of Malay idioms and proverbs that fully cover the classical, modern and verbal usages of the language. This component needs to be purchased separately.
* new! English Text-to-Speech. Dewan Eja Pro now integrates with Microsoft Speech to read out English words. This feature works with Kamus Inggeris Melayu Dewan and Daftar Istilah.
* new! Faster search. At least 5 times improvement in search speed.
* new! Word of the day. A rare word is displayed each day for your learning.
* AutoCorrect fixes frequently made spelling errors automatically.
* Thesaurus suggests synonyms to help make your writing livelier.
* Complete integration with MS Office, including MS Office 97/2000/XP/2003.
* Free encyclopedia, in English, integrated with dictionary. You can go from learning a new word to new knowledge.
* Free updates. The software automatically checks for updates when connected to Internet.



http://www.tntsb.com...p?q=DewanEjaPro

http://www.dewaneja.com/

Edited by Hang Li Po, 28 August 2007 - 11:49 PM.

TOO PHAT feat YASIN - ALHAMDULILLAH (ENGLISH VERSION)


#15 sg_han

sg_han

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
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  • Gender:Not Telling
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    none

Posted 26 August 2007 - 10:12 AM

I am proud to be a Malaysian Muslim
Actually, I’m not into this racial pride thing. Being Malay, Chinese or Indian is not really important. What matters is how you conduct yourself and what you contribute to society. And I’m not saying that just to get on everyone’s good side. Haha. But honestly, I am Muslim first and I am Malay and Chinese second

“The Almighty Allah has removed the false pride taking, which was practiced in the pre-Islamic period, where individuals took false pride with their ancestors (forefathers). All mankind belong (in lineage) to Adam (pbuh). Adam is created of soil (earth dirt).”



It is ironic that while many Malay ministers question Chinese Malaysian's loyalty to the country, it is the Malay Muslims themselves that ultimately put themselves as muslims first and malaysian second. how interesting can this get
大韓民國의國歌-愛國歌




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