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Chinese attitudes towards frogs


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#1 may

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Posted 29 October 2007 - 11:27 PM

Hi Everyone,

Historically, how do the people of China and Hong Kong view frogs, as animals and not food? Do you they like them? Are they good or bad luck?

#2 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 12:39 AM

Interesting question about chinese culture.. I've never really encountered any taboo associated with "Frogs". Personally, I would think it's considered a neutral animal. But "toads" are usually considered more negative in chinese culture.
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#3 Batcat

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Posted 30 October 2007 - 01:26 AM

In Feng Shui, a figurine of a three legged toad with a coin in its mouth is suppose to bring prosperity. I think there is a three legged toad on the moon in Chinese mythology.

#4 polar_zen

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 06:00 PM

Yes, actually. When you go to China, you see a lot of them in restaurants. I also noticed that some places have a statue of a cat holding a coin...is this a cultural import from Japan?
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#5 fireball

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 06:19 PM

Yes, actually. When you go to China, you see a lot of them in restaurants. I also noticed that some places have a statue of a cat holding a coin...is this a cultural import from Japan?


I believe the cat was from Japan, but the toad was from China.

#6 Shaolin

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 09:33 PM

In Fengshui or Geomancy, the 3 legged Wealth Toad is a good auspicious item to place in the house...But usually hidden...

The cat is called "Zao Cai Mao" or 招财猫 in Chinese meaning "Waving Wealth Cat" or Maneki Neko in Japanese....

Usually place in Business shopfronts.....
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#7 kaiselin

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 09:44 PM

Aren't frogs called 'field chickens'?

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#8 Shaolin

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Posted 01 November 2007 - 10:58 PM

Aren't frogs called 'field chickens'?


Ya true....Up till now...I still do not know why frogs are called "Field Chickens" too....田鸡....

There must be a story of the origins of the name.....and I think parents will still have problems explaining to their children the origins of this name...

But I guess it is novelty of calling it when it is served as a dish.....it does not sound as boorish as when written in a restaurant menu as "Frogs"...

Something like Dog meat which Chinese name it as "Xiang Rou" or "Fragrance meat".....香肉.....
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#9 kaiselin

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 12:04 AM

Ya true....Up till now...I still do not know why frogs are called "Field Chickens" too....田鸡....

There must be a story of the origins of the name.....and I think parents will still have problems explaining to their children the origins of this name...

But I guess it is novelty of calling it when it is served as a dish.....it does not sound as boorish as when written in a restaurant menu as "Frogs"...

Something like Dog meat which Chinese name it as "Xiang Rou" or "Fragrance meat".....香肉.....


Here in the states when ever you eat a different unusual meat, It is common to say It tastes like chicken. That must be true all over the world.
I have only had frog once and guess what? It did taste just like chicken.

This is the explanation I read:
Because frogs live in the rice paddies or fields, their legs when cooked up look just like chicken wings or legs, and they do taste like chicken, hence the name. If I remember correctly this was a nice way to say that you could not afford chicken and all you could bring home was frogs after working in the fields all day.
Im not so sure that frogs are boorish, They are usually concidered a fine French dish.

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#10 fireball

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 08:25 AM

Im not so sure that frogs are boorish, They are usually concidered a fine French dish.


You mean French are not boorish? Hee hee! :D I am just joking. Consider me as the ugly Chinese in the West.

Btw, I made a mistake to order Curry Frog in a fine Vetnamese restaurant in Orange County, California, the home of many fine Vetnamese and Vetnamese food. When the dish was served, I found my mistake. Each piece of frog was wrapped in a coat of flour and deep fried, so I can't see what I am eating. After chewing the 4th something that suspiciously like the head of a frog (too many irregular shaped bones to be the legs), I decided to stop. I generally avoid heads of any animal, so I was told I am not quite like other Chinese in this way. Besides the weird sensation of chewing on the bones, it did taste like chicken, and the sauces were great.

#11 kaiselin

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Posted 02 November 2007 - 10:07 AM

You mean French are not boorish? Hee hee! :D I am just joking. Consider me as the ugly Chinese in the West.

Btw, I made a mistake to order Curry Frog in a fine Vetnamese restaurant in Orange County, California, the home of many fine Vetnamese and Vetnamese food. When the dish was served, I found my mistake. Each piece of frog was wrapped in a coat of flour and deep fried, so I can't see what I am eating. After chewing the 4th something that suspiciously like the head of a frog (too many irregular shaped bones to be the legs), I decided to stop. I generally avoid heads of any animal, so I was told I am not quite like other Chinese in this way. Besides the weird sensation of chewing on the bones, it did taste like chicken, and the sauces were great.


ooooouuuhhhh, I left myself wide open for that one. :wallbash:

My first and only time of eating frog-legs was when I was a teen living in Arizona. An Chinese family moved into the apartment complex I lived in. My younger sister befriended one of their daughters that was her age. One day they invited me to visit the family, It was a very interesting experience. The whole extended family was in a small apartment. Only the husband and the little girl spoke any English at all. Every one was quite friendly, and very welcoming to me. The wife handed me a plate of what looked like tiny chicken legs covered with a thick dark red glaze. It was slightly hot but very strongly spiced like nothing I had ever tasted before, nor since. The only thing I understood was Frog, Barbeque and Canton.

Fireball your story of chewing on something suspicious, reminds me of a similar unpleasant experience I had a few years ago. I love marinated herring . My family always would buy a jar for Christmas. My husband and kids hate it , so I continue to buy it to treat myself. I go thou a particular routine when I eat it. I find a nice comfy spot and settle down to eat to my hearts content. Everyone knows just to leave me alone so I can enjoy my treat. I close my eyes, to savor the smell and the whole taste experience. Every thing was fantastic as always. Then, as I was chewing I got a totally unformiliar and rather unpleasant texture. I looked and the fillets had not been separated from the back bone to cut down on the steps to prepare the product and thereby reducing the cost of production.
I love trying new and different food, and I still love Marinated Herring, but I will never eat anything again without looking at it first so that I will be prepared to expect something different.

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#12 sylvester

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 10:54 PM

Hi Everyone,

Historically, how do the people of China and Hong Kong view frogs, as animals and not food? Do you they like them? Are they good or bad luck?



frog, is one of the original form of chinese dragon(chinese dragon is a mix image of many kinds of animals),
for really ancient time, peoples living on the land of china believe frog holding a superme power of breeding.
many pottery have forg drawings and frog should be a totem at that time.

frog lead many eggs, and some frog would carry their young for few days or weeks, so it make ancient chinese people think about the breeding power.

frog in chinese is 蛙, the sound is same as 娃,
and 女娃(or some said 女媧) is the one who creates human in chinese myth.
蛙 is the same sound of 瓜 at ancient time too, 瓜 in english... just some creeping plant bearing large edible fruit or the fruit (some of which are considered vegetables), including melon, squash, cucumber, etc...
a printing of 瓜 in house is a wish of having many offsprings, it connets with breeding too!

forgive my poor english@@
happy to know you guys interested in chinese culture!
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#13 TMPikachu

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 11:05 PM

isn't there a story about a magic frog, or a guy learning frog magic? A snake and snail are also involved. I've heard a Japanese story of it, but heard it came from China originally

might be one of the Outlaws of the Marsh
"the way has more than one name, and wise men have more than one method. Knowledge is such that it may suit all countries, so that all creatures may be saved..."

#14 sylvester

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Posted 14 November 2007 - 11:37 PM

isn't there a story about a magic frog, or a guy learning frog magic? A snake and snail are also involved. I've heard a Japanese story of it, but heard it came from China originally

might be one of the Outlaws of the Marsh



i dont know japanese myth.

and i never heard any chinese myth about snail...
there are some myth about snake in ancient cxhinese,
one myth said 女媧 and 伏羲 both having hunman's upper body, and snake body for lower part.
then having sex and born first group of human.
snake also represents might and sex in some chinese myth.
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#15 kaiselin

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Posted 15 November 2007 - 09:44 AM

frog on 瓜 /gua/ melon- Tang

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I

toad on lotus leaf - Ming
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Zhang zhouware water container in shape of toad
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