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Did England ever rule over China?


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#1 shiv

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 04:32 AM

I want to know "did England rule over China ever"?
since almost countries in Asia had been ruled over
by britishers,what about China........and if they did not
rule China ...what were the reasons.........

#2 General_Zhaoyun

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 04:48 AM

I want to know "did England rule over China ever"?
since almost countries in Asia had been ruled over
by britishers,what about China........and if they did not
rule China ...what were the reasons.........


England (or more properly Britain) did not rule the whole of China. Rather, they merely "colonized" only a few small parts of China towards late 19th and early 20th century.

After the loss of Opium War by China to Britain in 1842, under the Treaty of Nanjing (considered by China to be an unfair treaty), China was forced to open up 5 ports (Guangzhou, Fuzhou, Xiamen, Ningbo and Shanghai) to Britain's trade and also to cede Hongkong to Britain.

From 1894 till 1997, Britain basically ruled Hongkong as a colony. Britain also ruled parts of Shanghai till 1949 until PLA "liberated" Shanghai.

From Chinese point of view, the ambition of British interest in China during late 19th century was considered to be just part of foreign imperialism and domination. This consequently led to internal rife in China such as Taiping rebellion and chinese revolution in 1911.

The british were not able to 'rule' China because there were other foreign powers 'contending to carve up China' during late 19th century such as the French, German, Italian, American, Japanese etc. China tried to play between these powers in order to 'survive' and from 19th till 20th century, what's dominating chinese history was a case of surviving of chinese state from foreign domination and invasion.

From 1842 till 1949, China was basically in a state of self-rule and half-colonization by foreign power.

British ambition in China during early 20th century was basically interrupted by WWI and WWII, giving a chance for Japanese to take a greater interest in invading China from 1930s- 1945.

From 1842 till 1979, chinese history can be considered to be a 'dark period' which consisted of war, poverty and turbulence.
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#3 Yun

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 12:17 PM

since almost countries in Asia had been ruled over
by britishers,what about China


Don't forget that the French, Dutch, Portuguese, Spanish, and later Americans also ruled colonies in Southeast Asia. The British had the largest area - India (including present-day Pakistan and Bangladesh), Burma, Malaya, and part of Borneo - but they did not rule everything.

After the loss of Opium War by China to Britain in 1842, under the Treaty of Nanjing (considered by China to be an unfair treaty), China was forced to open up 5 ports (Guangzhou, Fuzhou, Xiamen, Ningbo and Shanghai) to Britain's trade and also to cede Hongkong to Britain.

From 1894 till 1997, Britain basically ruled Hongkong as a colony.


Hong Kong island was ceded to Britain in perpetuity after the first Opium War; the southern part of the Kowloon peninsula was ceded in perpetuity during the second war (the 'Arrow War') in 1860, with the cession replacing a lease of the territory that had been agreed seven months earlier. The New Territories were leased to Britain for 99 years in 1898. When the New Territories lease expired in 1997, Britain transferred sovereignty over all three parts of Hong Kong to the PRC under the terms of the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984: http://en.wikipedia....int_Declaration
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#4 Boleslaw I

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 09:06 PM

I have strongly emphasise this point in another the thread of Qing dynasty. Neither Great Britain nor France had any intension or ability to turn China into a colony. Political system in China, although had grown weak, still enough to held the country together. It is quite easy to compare the fate of the Moghul Empire with Chinese Qing dynasty. Furthermore, Britain no longer had enough power to overtake such a vast land. Dissentions between Britain and France, Britain and Russia (over Middle East areas such as Georgia and Bospherus) kept her from thinking of fully invading China. Newly antagonism between Britain and Germany disrupted any other ambitions.

After all, I still think that Chinese political strength and her traditional unification still played a vital role in holding from being torn apart by European powers.
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#5 galvatron prime

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Posted 27 April 2008 - 11:27 PM

I want to know "did England rule over China ever"?
since almost countries in Asia had been ruled over
by britishers,what about China........and if they did not
rule China ...what were the reasons.........


England can only conquer the weak country in Asian and in Africa , they unlike the Mongol who can beat Stronger nation like Jin ,Karakhitan ,Kieven Rus,Hungary etc , anyway Russia Tsar empires are actually rule almost half of Asian continent .

Edited by galvatron, 27 April 2008 - 11:35 PM.





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