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Paper Armour?


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#16 TMPikachu

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Posted 03 March 2005 - 06:17 PM

Paper armour was used mainly in the south where they are lots of rivers, swamps and other damp enviornments, and it rains alot too. So the armour would have had a nature level of wetness just by being there.

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I've heard the best paper comes from Korea though. Maybe they shipped it south...
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#17 thirdgumi

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Posted 07 March 2005 - 08:19 AM

I would rather wear an uncomfortable wet armour and be alive than to wear comfortable dry armour and be covered with arrows like a porcupine.

Or burnt alive. :D
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Therefor, its existence is a crime, and the punishment is death - thirdgumi

#18 Altaica Militarica

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Posted 13 May 2005 - 08:50 AM

Dear Collegues,

I have read this trend. I am to say that Koreans used to wear "paper armour" in XV centure (Korean "jigab") too.

According to the "Sejong Daewang shillok" the armour was done as usual Korean armour in the shape of "turumagi" - the traditional Korean robe. It does not differ from usual "soo un gab" or "p'eegab" by the style so they were represented in the original text by the same picture.

The scales were made of Korean high density paper folded several times and were painted with red, black or green laquer and joint together by smoked thongs of deer skin.

But according to the ballistic experiments of US Army Ballistic Center even the iron & bronze plates were pierced by arrows of good composite bow of Asian type. Only the felt lining allowed the soldier to avoid the serious wound as the arrowheads were stopped only by thick felt plate after being penetrated for 2-5 mm. through the iron/bronze scale.

How did these paper armours work in the battle?

Best regards,

Alexey.

#19 TMPikachu

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Posted 13 May 2005 - 11:44 AM

did it offer protection against bladed weapons?
are there any surviving examples?
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#20 Altaica Militarica

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Posted 14 May 2005 - 06:33 AM

did it offer protection against  bladed weapons?
are there any surviving examples?

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Koreans have only few samples of real survivng armour. There are brigandine type armours mainly. Some fabric armour & mail survive too. But these artifacts are of XVIII-XIX centures. I can not attach any images as I have no quota to do so.

Regarding the edged weapon - I have no good ideas regarding this matter. But I think paper scales woud not stay for even dao strike, not the panzershtekker or something lilke that.

Try to look through this WEB-site:

http://www.swords.pe.kr

but it looks to be shut down.

Best regards,

Alexey.

#21 Altaica Militarica

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 08:14 AM

Please look at this armour. It is a common model of early Chosun armour made of iron, leather or laquered paper lamellae.

Regards,

ALexey.

#22 TMPikachu

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Posted 23 May 2005 - 05:59 PM

are the arm guards sleeves, or do they only cover the top?
the plates on the side, what guards are those, armpit? Neck?
"the way has more than one name, and wise men have more than one method. Knowledge is such that it may suit all countries, so that all creatures may be saved..."

#23 Altaica Militarica

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Posted 24 May 2005 - 01:34 AM

are the arm guards sleeves, or do they only cover the top?
the plates on the side, what guards are those, armpit? Neck?

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It is robe-modeled traditional Korean armour (XV) with sleeves, not shoulder-protector.

The upper band is the collar of armour to guard one's neck and the 2 small pcs on the right side are the arm-pit protectors.

Best regards,

Alexey.

#24 Altaica Militarica

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Posted 01 June 2005 - 12:13 AM

I've read that it's stronger when damp/wet, the paper armor. If it's wet, then it would be hard to burn.

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According to the Encyclopedia of Korean National Culture the scales were soaked in salt water after lacquering and before assembly of the coat of armour. Of course they were quite dry when in usage :)

Best regards,

Alexey.

#25 kurukku

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 03:30 AM

Has anybody any pictures of such armour? The attachments in this thread are missing.

#26 naruwan

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Posted 01 April 2007 - 12:09 PM

I can wear a double layered Ci-Hai 辭海. I think that's be a very effective armour aside from being balky and heavy.
mudanin kata mudanin kata. kata siki-a kata siki-a. muhaiv ludun muhaiv ludun. kanta sipal tas-tas kanta sipal tas-tas. kanta sipal tunuh kanta sipal tunuh. sikavilun vini daingaz sikavilun vini daingaz.

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#27 ghostexorcist

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Posted 28 April 2007 - 01:15 PM

A small section from my Chinese Armour essay

Zhijia (纸甲), or paper armour originated during the Tang dynasty. It was said that this form of armour was made during the reign of Tangyizong (859 873 CE). During the Song-Hsia Wars, thirty thousand of this form of armour was made and worn by the besieged archers of the Song dynasty in the fortress in Shanxi. It was made from a form of processed paper being one to three inches thick. Under wet conditions such as rain the material would turn even tougher making it a valuable form of defence against arrows. This was an important tactical advantage of paper armour as metal armour, despite providing a much better protection, would rust under these conditions. Other advantages of this form of armour includes its lightness allowing perhaps the greatest form of mobility among all armour styles. Lightness was essential and hence the paper armour being one of the more preferred form of armour in areas of the south where there are a large amount of rivers and forests. During the campaign by General Qi Jiguang against the Japanese pirates, a large number of his troops wore this form of armour as it was effective against the firearms of the time. In addition, it was extremely flexible as well as cheap to produce.


Page 186 of the book Law and Order in Sung China (ISBN 0-521-41121-1) mentions how paper armor was sometimes given to archers in the service of the sheriff.

Could we get some pics of the armor on this thread? It seems those that were previously posted are no longer visible.

#28 Billwaa

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Posted 29 April 2007 - 08:49 PM

oh, nice. Paper armor. Even though I haven't really heard of this before, but it seems like it would work and possible. I knew that Chinese had done much with paper. For example, for military use, Kite, to measure the distance between their stand point and the enemy positions... Therefore, I wouldn't doubt if they have paper armor back then.

#29 kcrandal

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Posted 03 September 2010 - 06:34 AM

I tried looking for the US Army Ballistic Research paper mentioned in an earlier posting but haven't had any luck.

Altaica Militarica, could you post a link, or perhaps the complete title of the article in question?

I'm doing my thesis on paper armor, and would really appreciate access to the article if at all possible.

Many Thanks!

#30 Peter

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Posted 12 November 2010 - 11:13 AM

Hi guys,

What a coincidence, I have written an article on paper armour for Handpapermaking magazine a while ago. I got permission from the magazine to host it on my website as well, here is the link:
Practically Invulnerable - Chinese Paper Armour

That is was used makes sense, wet paper has a higher weight and so a higher inertia. One would think though that it would also make it weak, but perhaps the paper used was full of strong fibers to keep it together. Layers of fabric and paper are also mentioned.

-Peter
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To break the stubborn colt, to bend the bow.


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