Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Burial mounds in China


  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 mehranjangh

mehranjangh

    Military Commissioner (Jiedushi 节度使)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 86 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Tehran, Iran
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    none

Posted 03 October 2008 - 11:32 PM

Hello everybody.
I am doing some amateur research on burial mounds and although these mounds are abundant in the Asian steppes and also in many parts of Europe, I have only managed to find the Cheonmachong tomb in Korea. Does anybody know of anymore burial mounds in China, Korea or Japan?

#2 DaMo

DaMo

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

  • Super Moderator
  • 1,755 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Dubai
  • Interests:History, Philosophy, Law, Political Science, InfoTech
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Asian History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Prehistory, Early Imperial, Samguk

Posted 04 October 2008 - 02:18 AM

You can look up the following:

China: Qin Shi Huang Di's mausoleum QinLing, Han Jing Di's mausoleum Han YangLing, Han Wu Di's mausoleum Maoling, Western Xia pyramid tombs
Korea: Tombs of Goguryeo
Japan: Kofun
"If an archeologist calls something a finial, he usually he has no idea what it is"
"We Vandals get blamed for stuff that was actually done by some errant Lombard or Visigoth"
"Nationalism is much about forgetting as it is about remembering"

China historical vacation 2011 photos and videos: http://www.chinahist...na-trip-photos/

#3 Bates

Bates

    Provincial Governor (Cishi 刺史)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 37 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Beijing, China
  • Interests:I have written:<br />Chinese Dragons - Images of Asia (Oxford University Press)All About Chinese Dragons (TuDragons Press)<br />All About Females of the Forbidden City (TuDragons Press)<br />10,000 Chinese Numbers (TuDragons Press)<br />The Avocado Cookbook (Lulu Publications)<br />All About Eunuchs (In preparation)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese History, Dragons, Forbidden City,

Posted 09 December 2008 - 05:04 PM

Hello everybody.
I am doing some amateur research on burial mounds and although these mounds are abundant in the Asian steppes and also in many parts of Europe, I have only managed to find the Cheonmachong tomb in Korea. Does anybody know of anymore burial mounds in China, Korea or Japan?


There are many burial mounds in China.

These web sites mioght be of use to you:


http://www.philipcop.../china_pyr.html

http://www.china.org...ture/229549.htm

http://www.cassiopae...telpro_1947.htm

http://www.chinacult...ntent_47365.htm

http://www.unexplain...th.com/xian.php

http://web.utanet.at...ds_in_China.htm

http://images.google...htt...ow=1&sa=G

http://images.google...htt...ow=1&sa=G

#4 Kenneth

Kenneth

    Grand Marshal (Da Sima/Taiwei 大司马/太尉)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 1,491 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Ancient Chinese Arsenals
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Ancient Weapons. Artefact studies.

Posted 21 January 2009 - 05:18 PM

There are hundreds of tumulus around Xian alone, the tomb of the First Emperor is well known but there is also a 20 mile extent of West Han emperors tombs. All around these are attendant tombs from the size of a small garage to the size of a decent hill. The tradition continued for centuries in that area so that you see mounds routinely as you drive. The idea of using mountains, which then became the tomb, appealed in Tang times but still there are Tang royal tombs (some which you can enter the main chamber) at Qianling which belong to lesser nobles and are more typical mounds.
There are a variety of shapes, but the largest Han ones are basically pyramical, some with a flat area at top. Smaller ones can be more like mounds.
Even modern graves in farmland, of farmers, can be seen to be little mounds raised above the body. Even fresh graves like this with mingqi (funerary objects) can be seen in the countryside.

I have a thread with some pictures of Han & Tang tombs and their enviroment here: http://www.chinahist...?showtopic=5322

I also saw an earlier & massive tomb mound of the Yue which was said to be Goujian fathers outside Shaoxing (5th century BC), so the practice was spread across a large area although there were variations in the way different East Zhou states created their tombs. Not all raised mounds and some of the underground constructions were quite different.
Climb over the Great Firewall.
http://www3.youtube....h?v=tzax4KkQ4ug

Posted Image

#5 changsham

changsham

    State Undersecretary (Shangshu Lang 尚书郎)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 650 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    antiques and ceraimcs

Posted 21 January 2009 - 05:56 PM

I have seen the many burial mounds around Xian. They are like hills in an otherwise flat landscape. And there are numerous others all over China. Right in the middle of Chengdu there is the tomb of Five Dynasties Emperor of Shu, Wang Jiang. Just outside Luoyang there are two enormous mounds which date the Western Zhou.

I have been curious why the early Chinese revered montains and rocks. Perhaps because the cradle of civilization centered around the Loess plateau and Yellow river. Here there is generally an absence of stones of any kind and also mountains. The nearest mountains to Xian like Hua Shan in the Qinling range were revered as holy places.

Edited by changsham, 21 January 2009 - 06:09 PM.

Posted Image

#6 Kenneth

Kenneth

    Grand Marshal (Da Sima/Taiwei 大司马/太尉)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 1,491 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Ancient Chinese Arsenals
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Ancient Weapons. Artefact studies.

Posted 26 January 2009 - 07:10 PM

I have seen the many burial mounds around Xian. They are like hills in an otherwise flat landscape. And there are numerous others all over China. Right in the middle of Chengdu there is the tomb of Five Dynasties Emperor of Shu, Wang Jiang. Just outside Luoyang there are two enormous mounds which date the Western Zhou.

I have been curious why the early Chinese revered montains and rocks. Perhaps because the cradle of civilization centered around the Loess plateau and Yellow river. Here there is generally an absence of stones of any kind and also mountains. The nearest mountains to Xian like Hua Shan in the Qinling range were revered as holy places.

Mountains were thought to have been the lair of immortals, and rituals were held by emperors on sacred summits. Daoist magicians dwelt in such places & the mountain lair of immortals was then linked to the search for immortality in the Han period. The construction of tomb mounds, planted with trees, was in this way a creation of a mountain on the plains.
The hopes of finding the immortals and being transformed into an undying entity was one that the most powerful emperors sought after (except for the humanist Wendi who accepted mortality & asked people not to make a big show of mourning the dead).
The symbolic and spiritual importance of mountains is not only shown in the formation of the tombs of the Han emperors but also in the tomb objects which used the motif of the lair of immortals.
Mountain censors for example, and grainaries with mountains atop. Both bronze and ceramics exist on this theme.
The 2 images below are ceramic, one a censor and the other a 'hu' vessel (old images from Tony Allens site).

Posted Image
Posted Image
Climb over the Great Firewall.
http://www3.youtube....h?v=tzax4KkQ4ug

Posted Image

#7 水農奴

水農奴

    County Magistrate (Xianling 县令)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 5 posts

Posted 24 March 2009 - 11:54 PM

Hello everybody.
I am doing some amateur research on burial mounds and although these mounds are abundant in the Asian steppes and also in many parts of Europe, I have only managed to find the Cheonmachong tomb in Korea. Does anybody know of anymore burial mounds in China, Korea or Japan?


Also maybe look at the Dong San in Yunnan, Vietnam and elsewhere...




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users