Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Why did China develop such a large population?


  • Please log in to reply
24 replies to this topic

#16 Fechin

Fechin

    Commissioner (Shi Chijie 使持节)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 61 posts

Posted 04 November 2008 - 12:44 AM

China's population explosion had developed with Mao's policy. From 1900 to 1950, China's population was quite stable. The Korean War could be said to be the start of the communist policy to encourage baby-bearing.

The recent familyhood planning was a failure as a result of the breakdown of government apparatus. In China, there is the phenomenon of concubines, i.e., second wives, everywhere. The government, in pursuing financial gains, had used the one-child policy as a means to fine people.


So from 1900 to 1950, China was in its best shape? Japan got to regret that it did not wait for China to go downhill like now before it invade China.

After World War II, as percentage of the world population, China drop down from 25% to 20% now. Where is the population explosion?

#17 HappyHistorian

HappyHistorian

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

  • Supreme Scholar (Jinshi)
  • 1,645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Interests:Chinese History, British Imperial History, Australian History
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Cinema, Modern Chinese History

Posted 04 November 2008 - 04:27 AM

So from 1900 to 1950, China was in its best shape? Japan got to regret that it did not wait for China to go downhill like now before it invade China.

After World War II, as percentage of the world population, China drop down from 25% to 20% now. Where is the population explosion?

China did not win World War II because of their sheer numbers, the Allies won the war for China. The population did grow very quickly from 700 million in the 1960s to 1,300 million where it is now. Therefore there was a population explosion.

#18 MattW

MattW

    Grand Marshal (Da Sima/Taiwei 大司马/太尉)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 1,328 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chairman Mao

Posted 04 November 2008 - 10:08 AM

China did not win World War II because of their sheer numbers, the Allies won the war for China. The population did grow very quickly from 700 million in the 1960s to 1,300 million where it is now. Therefore there was a population explosion.


With those stats, china's population grew 15 million per year if this progression was a constant and not exponential- even that flat average is an explosion. And as HappyHistorian says, it was the allies and specifically their atomic bombs that won the war for China, not the efforts of china itself.

#19 ahxiang

ahxiang

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 1,636 posts

Posted 04 November 2008 - 02:56 PM

With those stats, china's population grew 15 million per year if this progression was a constant and not exponential- even that flat average is an explosion. And as HappyHistorian says, it was the allies and specifically their atomic bombs that won the war for China, not the efforts of china itself.



Your statement should be revised as:

it was the JOINT EFFORTS of allies and specifically their atomic bombs that won the war for China & THE WORLD, not the MERE efforts of china itself.

By the way, your war heros, Peng Dehuai and Zhu De did not ever engage in a battle against a Shidan equialent of Japanese Army throughout the war.

About China's population explosion: In the old days, my maternal and paternal grandmas both had 6-10 child bearings, with 5-6 survivors each. The difference was some women chose to have less, and some women chose to have none. In Mao's days, it was a political task for women to bear children.

In today's China, there is a loophole to one child policy. Anyone who had a divorce could re-marry to have another child. We don't want to talk about the high divorce rate to know the one child policy was a bankrupt scheme.

#20 MattW

MattW

    Grand Marshal (Da Sima/Taiwei 大司马/太尉)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 1,328 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chairman Mao

Posted 04 November 2008 - 03:37 PM

Your statement should be revised as:

it was the JOINT EFFORTS of allies and specifically their atomic bombs that won the war for China & THE WORLD, not the MERE efforts of china itself.


It wasn't really a join effort really thinking about it- the USA got the bomb, and it was the USA that ended the war in Asia with it. And Chinese efforts had very little part to play in victory- the a-bomb achieved this alone... Its a bit of an over simplification, but the importance of the atomic bomb cannot be stressed enough...

#21 HappyHistorian

HappyHistorian

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

  • Supreme Scholar (Jinshi)
  • 1,645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Interests:Chinese History, British Imperial History, Australian History
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Cinema, Modern Chinese History

Posted 04 November 2008 - 04:03 PM

Your statement should be revised as:

it was the JOINT EFFORTS of allies and specifically their atomic bombs that won the war for China & THE WORLD, not the MERE efforts of china itself.

By the way, your war heros, Peng Dehuai and Zhu De did not ever engage in a battle against a Shidan equialent of Japanese Army throughout the war.

About China's population explosion: In the old days, my maternal and paternal grandmas both had 6-10 child bearings, with 5-6 survivors each. The difference was some women chose to have less, and some women chose to have none. In Mao's days, it was a political task for women to bear children.

In today's China, there is a loophole to one child policy. Anyone who had a divorce could re-marry to have another child. We don't want to talk about the high divorce rate to know the one child policy was a bankrupt scheme.

Yes I do agree that the joint effort between the Chinese and the Allies led to victory. I do not accept that the dropping of the atomic bombs led to victory. Japan was on the verge of defeat, even without the A-Bomb. China kept the Japanese Army busy, while the Allies fought primarily the Japanese Navy.

During Mao's time there were still large families as it was customary to do so.

I thought about what would happen if a Chinese person wanted to get a divorce in the current system in Chinese Family Law. Even if they divorce and conceive another child, I don't think it will expand the population too greaty more than it already is. By 2050 China is estimated to have a population of 1.4 billion people. So that is an increase of 200 million, which is not the exponential increase of 600 million between the 1960s to the present. Therefore China's population will grow and contract.

Edited by HappyHistorian, 04 November 2008 - 04:06 PM.


#22 MattW

MattW

    Grand Marshal (Da Sima/Taiwei 大司马/太尉)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 1,328 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chairman Mao

Posted 04 November 2008 - 04:57 PM

Interesting... i just rationalise it that if the bomb had been dropped but China had not fought against the Japanese the war would still have been won, whereas the other way around i can certainly see the conflict in Asia dragging on into the future, resulting in further loss of life... but each to their own eh?

#23 HappyHistorian

HappyHistorian

    Prime Minister (Situ/Chengxiang 司徒/丞相)

  • Supreme Scholar (Jinshi)
  • 1,645 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sydney, Australia
  • Interests:Chinese History, British Imperial History, Australian History
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Cinema, Modern Chinese History

Posted 04 November 2008 - 09:52 PM

Interesting... i just rationalise it that if the bomb had been dropped but China had not fought against the Japanese the war would still have been won, whereas the other way around i can certainly see the conflict in Asia dragging on into the future, resulting in further loss of life... but each to their own eh?

That is a fair statement. Japan could never match the economic power of the USA. Japan was nearly bankrupt from the war, while only 10% of America's GDP was spent on the war. Also USA could easily fight in two theatres of war: Europe and the Pacific.

#24 mariusj

mariusj

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 2,061 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History

Posted 04 November 2008 - 11:57 PM

Interesting... i just rationalise it that if the bomb had been dropped but China had not fought against the Japanese the war would still have been won, whereas the other way around i can certainly see the conflict in Asia dragging on into the future, resulting in further loss of life... but each to their own eh?


Are you saying if Japanese forces were freed up from China, they would not advance any further? If funding for army were moved [due to not fighting a large scale all out war in China] into the navy, US would still take out Japan piece by piece?

#25 MattW

MattW

    Grand Marshal (Da Sima/Taiwei 大司马/太尉)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 1,328 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:UK
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chairman Mao

Posted 06 November 2008 - 03:04 AM

Are you saying if Japanese forces were freed up from China, they would not advance any further? If funding for army were moved [due to not fighting a large scale all out war in China] into the navy, US would still take out Japan piece by piece?


Its hard to know exactly- all i was saying was that chinese involvement in the war was not as decisive as the creation of nuclear weapons by the USA...




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users