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Dynasty Warriors game historically accurate?


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#1 Familyguy1

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 08:37 AM

Honestly this is what got me interested in CMH(Chinese Military History), Especially this time period, but also reading The Art of War.

I was curious if most of the characters in this game are loosely based on historical figures? and if some are not where would they have come from? Chinese Myth?

Also are most of the battles based on real battles?

Also does the game take place in the Warring States Period? with Cao Cao and Dong Zhou Liu Bian etc?

Sorry if this is a little short, off to work in a few minutes, I just wanted to get an opinion.

#2 WangGeon

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 10:50 AM

Honestly this is what got me interested in CMH(Chinese Military History), Especially this time period, but also reading The Art of War.

I was curious if most of the characters in this game are loosely based on historical figures? and if some are not where would they have come from? Chinese Myth?

Also are most of the battles based on real battles?

Also does the game take place in the Warring States Period? with Cao Cao and Dong Zhou Liu Bian etc?

Sorry if this is a little short, off to work in a few minutes, I just wanted to get an opinion.


"Dynasty Warriors" is extremely loosely based on the classic historical novel, Romance of the Three Kingdoms. The game itself is very excessively exaggerated and anime-inspired so it's about as accurate as the movie "Braveheart" [meaning, not really accurate at all!]. The battles are based on real events, except for the hypothetical story arcs that can take place if you choose a certain warrior in the game, which in this case makes "Dynasty Warriors" a bit like a role-playing game with heavy button-mashing elements. I find the game entertaining, although it's much more mindless and mildlly ridiculous than anything I've ever played; probably why it's addictive. ;)

And no, the game does not take place in the Warring States Period; it's the "Three Kingdoms Period," an interesting era at the close of the Han Dynasty, but one that's quite frankly been done to death in almost every popular medium. Many of the more knowledgeable members here can tell you much more about the "Three Kingdoms Period." There's also a series by Koei based on the system used in "Dynasty Warriors" called "Samurai Warriors," which is based on the Japanese Warring States Period of the late 15th to 16th centuries.

The novel, by the way, is very fascinating, especially as it has so many plot twists, interesting characters, and clever strategems. If you can't read Chinese, there are many translations of the novel including a "shortened" version that gives the general gist of the story and complete translations of the novel's most important points.

I should also note that the novel also exaggerates a lot and has a heavy bias toward Liu Bei's Shu-Han faction, even though they lose out toward the end. It should again be seen as a popular medium based on history and not actual history itself. The more accurate Three Kingdoms period history is the historical record the Sanguozhi, which is simply a laconic historical record of events.

Edited by WangGeon, 02 September 2009 - 11:06 AM.


#3 Familyguy1

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Posted 02 September 2009 - 05:27 PM

"Dynasty Warriors" is extremely loosely based on the classic historical novel, Romance of the Three Kingdoms. The game itself is very excessively exaggerated and anime-inspired so it's about as accurate as the movie "Braveheart" [meaning, not really accurate at all!]. The battles are based on real events, except for the hypothetical story arcs that can take place if you choose a certain warrior in the game, which in this case makes "Dynasty Warriors" a bit like a role-playing game with heavy button-mashing elements. I find the game entertaining, although it's much more mindless and mildlly ridiculous than anything I've ever played; probably why it's addictive. ;)

And no, the game does not take place in the Warring States Period; it's the "Three Kingdoms Period," an interesting era at the close of the Han Dynasty, but one that's quite frankly been done to death in almost every popular medium. Many of the more knowledgeable members here can tell you much more about the "Three Kingdoms Period." There's also a series by Koei based on the system used in "Dynasty Warriors" called "Samurai Warriors," which is based on the Japanese Warring States Period of the late 15th to 16th centuries.

The novel, by the way, is very fascinating, especially as it has so many plot twists, interesting characters, and clever strategems. If you can't read Chinese, there are many translations of the novel including a "shortened" version that gives the general gist of the story and complete translations of the novel's most important points.

I should also note that the novel also exaggerates a lot and has a heavy bias toward Liu Bei's Shu-Han faction, even though they lose out toward the end. It should again be seen as a popular medium based on history and not actual history itself. The more accurate Three Kingdoms period history is the historical record the Sanguozhi, which is simply a laconic historical record of events.


Ah ok. I love both Japans and Chinas Military History, so I naturally get those confused. Well thanks for the answer!




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