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Goguryeo (高句麗 / 고구려) - more Chinese or Korean?


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#91 WangKon936

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 01:19 AM

lol this is filled with korean nationalism. So Koreans influenced Japanese dress. Koreans taught Japanese how to wrestle. What is next?

 

According to Nihon Shoki, The Chronicles of Japan, Grand Minister Soga built the first first garden in Japan with help from Baekje engineers. Also according to Nihon Shoki, Baekje brought Buddhism to Japan and Chinese letters were brought to Japan by two Baekje scholars: Wang In and Achiki.

 

Here is the Wiki article on Wang In: http://en.wikipedia..../Wani_(scholar)

 

In the early period the Japanese kingdoms relied on their Korean allies to import continental technology and culture due to geographic proximity.  Also, sometimes the Chinese court did not take Japanese envoys seriously.  Yamato's first diplomatic mission to the Sui Dynasty was rejected.

 

I used tomb paintings from the Takamatsu tomb in Japan because it had the clearest example of Baekje style clothing. The Takamatsu tomb was originally thought to be the tomb of emperor Monbu, but given that the tomb had so many Korean-style wall paintings, many Japanese scholars now believe it to be the tomb of a Korean person, maybe it was Kudara no Konikishi Zenko, the Japanese name of a son of the last King of Baekje.

 

The controversy of who is buried in the tomb is outlined here: http://en.wikipedia....amatsuzuka_Tomb


Edited by WangKon936, 02 August 2013 - 01:39 AM.


#92 YummYakitori

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 03:33 AM

YY,
 
I think your intentions are honest, so I just want to let you know that my tone here is civil and academically sterile.  In response to your last comment direct towards me, I think that the key take away is not if a certain cultural trait was practiced in a country at a certain point in time but it is one of cultural penetration.  How deeply did the cultural influence of one country penetrate the other?  
 
Another factor to consider.  China is a big country with many ethnicities and languages that were hardly unified or monolithic by Tang times.  There were some Tungustic and Nomadic cultural elements that seeped into Chinese culture, especially in the north.  Plus, China's boundaries changed and cultural influence spheres changed.  Things that are not a part of the "core" culture do not last long and are not passed down or preserved.  Things that may have been practiced in China, because they were not "core" to that culture, were not practiced later on in its history.
 
Now, with those points established, let's move on the the specific cultural traits.  Yes, anybody can put peasant feathers into a cap.  However, how you dress your envoy (especially to a nation like Tang) is very important.  It would appear that Unified Silla, after it conquered most of the peninsula, consciously wanted their envoys to look like Koguryo's envoys.  Plus, the headdress aspect denotes a cultural similarity.  Both Silla and Koguryo believed birds to be sacred.  Both Koguryo and Silla royal crowns had bird motifs.  Their envoys relayed this national characteristic and Koguryo and Silla had similar national characteristics represented by the dress that their envoys wore to the region's most powerful nation (Tang).
 
Regarding the Yeonji Gonji.  Perhaps it came from the geographic region of what is today's China.  Maybe it didn't.  However, is it an attribute of China's central plains "core" culture or is it a Chinese borrowing of a Tungustic or Turkic/Mongolic attribute that was common in the north?  Given the extreme dating of 1150 BC, it would be very hard to verify anything.  What we do have are Koguryo tomb murals that show the yeonji gonji used commonly throughout.  Consistently through both tomb paintings in Pyongyang, North Korea and Jilin, China, we see paintings of young women wearing the yeonji gonji.  Again, this practice continues on in modern Korea.  It did not continue on in China, so I'm guessing it wasn't a core part of its culture.
 
Regarding the wrestling.  Okay, do the Chinese practice this kind of wrestling now?  It is clear that Silla got this kind of wrestling from Koguryo and Japan probably got it from Baekje.  Even Chinese sources indicate Ssireum's relationship with Kogouryo as it was sometimes called goguryeogi (고구려기:高句麗技).  It was deep in Korea's existing culture as Ssireum is still practiced to this very day:
 
http://www.youtube.c...h?v=NDz_ub4uVWs
 
Regarding dress.  The dress of upper class of the Korean Three Kingdom's Period are generally very sinitic.  This probably has something to do with the fact that there was a Qing/Han Chinese cultural presence in the north-center of the peninsula in the form of the Lelang Commandery.  However, as the direct Chinese presence was ended by the annexation of Lelang by Koguryo in the early 4th century AD, this allowed the three peninsula kingdoms to establish their own unique variations.  From tomb paintings in Japan we find Koguryo and Baekje styles of dress to be very similar to each other, but quite distinct from Sui/Tang clothing.  Korean upper class clothing probably evolved after Qing/Han Dynasty styles and followed their own evolutionary tract.
 
A commonality between Koguryo, Baekje and Silla upper class women's clothing was the multi-colored pleated skirt, per these examples:
 
Koguryo:
 
cp0213100504_001_460_zpsbd4c5730.jpg
 
 
cp0213100514_001_460_zpscb0da9b9.jpg
 
Baekje:
 
S5003115_zps0f95c16d.jpg
 
Silla:
 
cp0213301913_001_460_zpsbf16aa6d.jpg
 
The frequency and unified nature of this style does not repeat in Chinese Sui/Tang.

Birds being sacred weren't prevalent just in Korean culture. Just as how Chinese culture is penetrated by other northern nomadic cultures, Korean culture might have been one of the subjects too. Mythical birds such as phoenixes (鳳凰) appeared very early in Chinese history and it is seen as another one of China's iconic mythical creatures besides the dragon.

The Goguryeo Samjok-eo (三足烏 / 삼족오) is also found in ancient Chinese culture. Samjok-eo was said to have spread from China to Korea.

三足烏,亦稱為金烏、赤烏,主要是侍奉西王母,是汉族神话中太阳之灵。

Translation; Sanzuwu, or three-legged crow, is also called "Golden Crow" or "Red Crow", it is mainly used to service Queen Xiwangmu, it is the soul of the sun in legends of the Han Chinese

Queen Xiwangmu is a Taoist deity and the records of her alleged appearance have been found on Shang oracle bones dating back to around 1400 BC. She was said to have green three-legged crows that would look for food.

As for the Yeonji Gonji (연지곤지), I found more details;

연지가 처음 만들어진 것은 옛날은(殷)나라 주 왕(紂王)의 왕비였던 요염하고 음탕하며

Yeonji Gonji originated in the Yin Dynasty (殷朝), which is also known as the Shang Dynasty (商朝) in China but both can be used interchangeably. Emperor Zhouwang's (or Juwang in Korean) wife, the queen,started this practice.

This proves that Yeonji Gonji is not a northern nomadic practice by the Mongolians or Manchus etc.

I didn't show the wrestling to tell you that Ssireum in Korea existed from China, it was to tell you that many cultures in the region had wrestling, not just Goguryeo, Japanese and other northern Mongolian tribes.

As Modu Chanyu said, contrary to many other cultures, black was actually a color of fortune and prosperity for the ancient Chinese, however this later evolved and red was the new "lucky" color starting from around the Zhou.

The people of Goguryeo usually dressed in brown, black, red, and sometimes with lines of intricate golden-painted mythical creatures. Also notice how the people of Goguryeo in ur picture has their hair tied up in a bun that looks somewhat Chinese - whereas the Shilla upper class wore something like the Phoenix Crown adorned by upper class Han Chinese females, usually the queen or empress. As for the Baekje hairstyle it looks weird.

Huh? What do you mean by that there was a Qing influence on Korea? During the Han Dynasty reign of the Korean Peninsula, and before that, very few Manchus actually bothered about Korea because the Manchus back then were known as the Sushen (肅慎) and they were actually lurking in the Primorsky Krai region of Russia (Outer Manchuria) which was quite far from Korea. Qing Dynasty influence over Korea was only starting from 1644 but the Jin Dynasty (金朝) also by the Manchus also managed to occupy Korea.

Another type of Phoenix Tail Skirt (鳳尾裙):
http://www.chinasilk...22214536990.jpg

Colorful skirts were also found in Chinese culture back then.

Edited by YummYakitori, 03 August 2013 - 07:18 AM.

Буурэг дэрсэнд уурэглэсэн бужин туулай нь ч амгалан Булээн нууранд нь ганганалдсан хотон шувууд нь ч амгалан Буувэй санаа нь ивлэсэн Бусгуй сэптгэл нь ч амгалан хонхон дуутай бойтгийг нь Цэцэг унсэх нь энхрийхэн хöгöн горхины урсгалд нь Цэнгэг хараахай зуггуйхэн Хиртэшгуй ариухан дагшинд нь Монголын узэсгэлэн яруухан

#93 WangKon936

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 10:06 PM

Huh? What do you mean by that there was a Qing influence on Korea?

 

Sorry, I meant Qin, not Qing.  I remember reading something that said that the Chinese colonists at Lelang spoke the Qin language.



#94 WangKon936

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Posted 02 August 2013 - 11:27 PM

The samjok-o (sanzuwu) was used by Chinese, Korean and Japanese civilizations in antiquity.  That much we agree.  However, it was Koguryo, Baekje and Yamato Japan that used the samjok-o as a national symbol, thus moving beyond folklore to association with state cult.  Using a symbol as a state cult shows cultural affinity and assumption of heritage.  I do not believe that any Chinese kingdom ever used the three legged crow as a symbol of the nation.

 

Have any Chinese companies incorporated the samjok-o into their companies' logos?  The Koreans have:

 

nara-bank.gif

 

pseudo1_zpsd4a72765.jpg

 

The South Korean government of today is considering to put the samjok-o on the national seal.  I don't believe that China has ever considered using the samjok-o as a national symbol.  The Koreans are doing this because this symbol is more important and more deeply rooted in their culture than it would be in Chinese culture.

 

Regarding ssireum or goguryogi (고구려기/高句麗技), it is still practiced in Korea today.  Ssireum has not been practiced in China (other than the Chaoxian minority in today's PRC).  This cultural trait has best been preserved in modern Korea.

 

Regarding the Yeonji Gonji.  The mongols have it too:

 

securedownload_zpsba71e2af.jpg

 

Perhaps it came from China ultimately, but modern day Koreans got it from Koguryo.  They have kept it and the Chinese have not.  They have preserved this cultural trait better.  Again, maybe because it penetrated their culture better because it was more widespread among the Korean Three Kingdoms.

 

Comments on hairstyle are too general and I don't really want to talk about it too much.  You may want to show some images of Sui or Tang hair styles that are similar if you want to further develop your point.

 

The multicolored pleated skirt is a cultural trait shared by all three kingdoms in Korea.  It was a common fashion statement.  I don't see any evidence it was common in China.  If it was, please provide some evidence.

 

There is another Koguryo tradition that's preserved in modern day Korea that I didn't mention.  The game of yut nori (윷놀이):

 

Koguryo_Yut_zps3bcd42f3.jpg

 

Played every new year my most Korean families.

 

Korean_yut_zps54d4c5e4.jpg

 

The playing board was sometimes carved into stone.  The following pictures are stone yutnori boards found in former Koguryo territory on the peninsula:

 

f0006957_4c61a69e00277_zps33361255.jpg


Edited by WangKon936, 03 August 2013 - 12:29 AM.


#95 YummYakitori

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 12:34 AM

The samjok-o (sanzuwu) was used by Chinese, Korean and Japanese civilizations in antiquity.  That much we agree.  However, it was Koguryo, Baekje and Yamato Japan that used the samjok-o as a national symbol, thus moving beyond folklore to association with state cult.  Using a symbol as a state cult shows cultural affinity and assumption of heritage.  I do not believe that any Chinese kingdom ever used the three legged crow as a symbol of the nation.
 
Have any Chinese companies incorporated the samjok-o into their companies' logos?  The Koreans have:
 
nara-bank.gif
 
pseudo1_zpsd4a72765.jpg
 
The South Korean government of today is considering to put the samjok-o on the national seal.  I don't believe that China has ever considered using the samjok-o as a national symbol.  The Koreans are doing this because this symbol is more important and more deeply rooted in their culture than it would be in Chinese culture.
 
Regarding ssireum or goguryogi (고구려기/高句麗技), it is still practiced in Korea today.  Ssireum has not been practiced in China (other than the Chaoxian minority in today's PRC).  This cultural trait has best been preserved in modern Korea.
 
Regarding the Yeonji Gonji.  The mongols have it too:
 
securedownload_zpsba71e2af.jpg
 
Perhaps it came from China ultimately, but modern day Koreans got it from Koguryo.  They have kept it and the Chinese have not.  They have preserved this cultural trait better.  Again, maybe because it penetrated their culture better because it was more widespread.
 
Comments on hairstyle are too general and I don't really want to talk about it too much.  You may want to show some images of Sui or Tang hair styles that are similar if you want to further develop your point.
 
The multicolored pleated skirt is a cultural trait shared by all three kingdoms in Korea.  It was a common fashion statement.  I don't see any evidence it was common in China.  If it was, please provide some evidence.
 
There is another Koguryo tradition that's preserved in modern day Korea that I didn't mention.  The game of yut nori (윷놀이):
 
Koguryo_Yut_zps3bcd42f3.jpg
 
Played every new year my most Korean families.
 
Korean_yut_zps54d4c5e4.jpg
 
The playing board was sometimes carved into stone.  The following pictures are stone yutnori boards found in former Koguryo territory on the peninsula:
 
f0006957_4c61a69e00277_zps33361255.jpg
 
Koguryo yutnori board:
 
f0006957_4c61a8aa84871.jpg


I agree that the Samjeok-oh (三足烏 / 삼족오) is more deeply rooted in Korean culture than Chinese culture although its first appearance in East Asia started from China. Neither has any Han Chinese dynasty made it their national symbol - the two most "prized" mythical figures are often either the Phoenix (鳳凰) or Dragon (龍).

However, I don't think South Korea should consider putting the three-legged crow on their national seal. This would likely aggravate China even further, considering the fact that Korean nationalists claiming for Confucius (孔子 / 공자) and Duanwujie (端午節 / 단오제) have already sparked some emotions amongst the general Chinese population.

Another one of South Korea's most important symbols - the Taegeuk (太極 / 태극) was actually from Taoism as well. I don't really understand why South Korea places 2 Chinese Taoist symbols - the Taegeuk and the Bagua (八卦) on their national flag - I know the current South Korean flag has been in place since the Korean Empire period (late 1890s - early 1910s) but maybe they should consider changing it to something uniquely Korean instead of relying on Chinese culture for their national symbols.

There isn't a lot of details on the Internet about the Fengweiqun (鳳尾裙). I will try looking for some and posting it up here :) But it is said that Fengweiqun (鳳尾裙) became very common, not just for the upperclass but for everybody, during the Qingmominchu (清末民初) period, which is around the 1900s. It's exact date of appearance is unknown due to lack of information.

But what it seems like is that very few people in Goguryeo at that time wore COLORFUL plaited skirts: http://feelingbox.co.../1203577956.jpg
http://www.cultureco...010_001_460.jpg

You have to understand that Han Chinese (漢族) have a rather complex history - especially for the early part, when the Zhou took over the Shang, they kept many of Shang's ancient cultures but also oppressed some. While some say that the Zhou are actually northern nomads from Northwest China and the Shang are the true "Han", today's Han Chinese are a mix of both. Just like any other ethnic race, there is no "pure" Han Chinese today.

As for the hairstyles, it depends. There are many types of Tang and Song Dynasty hairstyles, as well as Goguryeo hairstyles. The one you showed me had the hair tied into a bun and a golden chopstick pierced through it. But I found some other hairstyles that were not that intricate, some with just long hair and a white headband. I don't really know which is the legitimate one but it would be good if you can show me some :)

Yutnori (윷놀이) is a very interesting topic to begin with. It is found to be quite similar to the Indian Pachisi (樗蒲), of which date of origin is unknown, but already by the 3rd century BC, it had spread to the Wei Dynasty (魏朝) of China. The Goguryeo Yutnori might have also been borrowed from India via China as well. Not saying for sure, but maybe.

Also, the game of Yutnori has it's board design, the Malpan (말판) based on Taoism, a Chinese philosophy.

http://c.ask.nate.com/imgs/qrsi.php/8116015/10620256/0/1/A/윷놀이말판_evopro.jpg
(Not the animals, the board design where the animals are placed)

It's interesting to find that the Mongolians have the Yeonji Gonji (연지곤지) as well. I mostly see it only on Korean dramas where the traditional Korean wedding is held.
Буурэг дэрсэнд уурэглэсэн бужин туулай нь ч амгалан Булээн нууранд нь ганганалдсан хотон шувууд нь ч амгалан Буувэй санаа нь ивлэсэн Бусгуй сэптгэл нь ч амгалан хонхон дуутай бойтгийг нь Цэцэг унсэх нь энхрийхэн хöгöн горхины урсгалд нь Цэнгэг хараахай зуггуйхэн Хиртэшгуй ариухан дагшинд нь Монголын узэсгэлэн яруухан

#96 WangKon936

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 01:25 AM

Similarities between commoner clothes of the Three Kingdoms:

 

Koguryo:

 

4668d9831f9ff&filename=%EB%82%A8%EB%85%8

 

Baekje:

 

Baekje_Commoners_zpsab4fc0e9.jpg?t=13755

 

4668d775abb6f&filename=%EB%AC%BC%EA%BC%A

 

Silla:

 

362366840.jpg

 

 

cp0615c14002_001_460.jpg

 

Coming back to envoy clothing, here is a photo of the three Korean kingdoms from the same Tang document:

 

Three_Kingdom_Envoys_zps8b849c2f.jpg

 

The order from left to right is Baekje, Koguryo and Silla.  Please notice the similarity, especially when compared to other periphery and tributary states of Tang:

 

SAM_5153_zpsb410538e.jpg

 

Also, notice similarity between Silla Hwarang warrior and Koguyo hunter/archer outfit:

 

First is the Silla Hwarang archer:

 

museum%20warrior3.JPG

 

Koguryo hunter/archer:

 

images4_zpse5d5584f.jpg


Edited by WangKon936, 05 August 2013 - 03:40 PM.


#97 mohistManiac

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 01:28 AM

I must admit I think that is a perfect cultural seal design for Korea.  It is a stylized version of the three footed blackbird and is immediately recognized as a Korean piece of artwork.  Why should only some people have that symbol is beyond me.  If in fact we must come to admit that cultures are a shared phenomenon in the same way commodities being sold and purchased from afar relay the cultural message.  If one makes it their own there should be no reason not to inherit a symbol as a feature of the underlying culture.


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I have the fortune of living in the part of the world which has use for toilet paper, but not douches.

#98 WangKon936

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 02:05 AM

considering the fact that Korean nationalists claiming for Confucius (孔子 / 공자) and Duanwujie (端午節 / 단오제) have already sparked some emotions amongst the general Chinese population.

 

Most Koreans don't believe that Confucius is Korean.  That is a fringe belief and sometimes the extent at which some Koreans believe it is exaggerated by Chinese and Taiwanese media and blog commenters IMHO.

 

Regarding Duanwujie.  I already covered the confusion here.  Actually, it was a comment directed towards you: http://www.chinahist...tory/?p=5010024

 

I am surprised that you are still confused by the matter.  



#99 YummYakitori

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 07:07 AM

Most Koreans don't believe that Confucius is Korean.  That is a fringe belief and sometimes the extent at which some Koreans believe it is exaggerated by Chinese and Taiwanese media and blog commenters IMHO.
 
Regarding Duanwujie.  I already covered the confusion here.  Actually, it was a comment directed towards you: http://www.chinahist...tory/?p=5010024
 
I am surprised that you are still confused by the matter.  

People forget things easily. LOL. I'm sorry.

Similarities between commoner clothes of the Three Kingdoms:
 
Koguryo:
 
4668d9831f9ff&filename=%EB%82%A8%EB%85%8
 
4668d775abb6f&filename=%EB%AC%BC%EA%BC%A
 
Silla:
 
362366840.jpg

I do see a resemblance between these clothing and the Shang Dynasty Hanfu (商朝漢服) though:
Shang Dynasty Hanfu: http://www.vartcn.co...09121554543.jpg

I also thought the Shang Dynasty archer (商朝武士) looked somewhat like a Hwarang archer and the Koguryo archer:
http://a2.att.hudong...33282745125.jpg
http://baike.baidu.c...cms/rc/商2.jpg

Also notice the hat of the Shang archer, doesn't it look a bit like the Jougwan (조우관) you showed me?

Note: Reconstruction of the Shang armor, bow and helmet is based off excavations from Anyang, Henan (安陽市河南省), which was one of the cultural centers of the Shang.

Edited by YummYakitori, 03 August 2013 - 07:12 AM.

Буурэг дэрсэнд уурэглэсэн бужин туулай нь ч амгалан Булээн нууранд нь ганганалдсан хотон шувууд нь ч амгалан Буувэй санаа нь ивлэсэн Бусгуй сэптгэл нь ч амгалан хонхон дуутай бойтгийг нь Цэцэг унсэх нь энхрийхэн хöгöн горхины урсгалд нь Цэнгэг хараахай зуггуйхэн Хиртэшгуй ариухан дагшинд нь Монголын узэсгэлэн яруухан

#100 Danny.T

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 06:20 PM

Agree. Koguryo and Buyeo inherited a lot of Shang culture.

#101 Hansaram

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:15 PM

Many of the oldest noble families of Korea came directly from Shang's ruling class. Their established presence in all three Korean kingdoms may have been what bound the three together.

 

Korea doesn't speak Chinese. So that could mean all of Shang was once Korean speaking (which is perhaps a coastal O/C type language that once extended all the way to Indian coastlines) or just the ruling class of Shang were native Korean speakers but bilingual.

 

By the way, Confucius is descended from Shang's royal family.


Edited by Hansaram, 03 August 2013 - 11:00 PM.


#102 YummYakitori

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 10:54 PM

Many of the oldest noble families of Korea came directly from Shang's ruling class. Their established presence in all three Korean kingdoms is what bound the three together.
 
Korea doesn't speak Chinese. So either that means all of Shang was once Korean speaking (or a coastal O/C type language), or just the ruling class were native Korean speakers but bilingual.
 
By the way, Confucius is descended from Shang's royal family.


LOL. Wangkon, see what I mean? Claiming the Shang Dynasty to be Korean, claiming Confucius to be Korean. Why can't it be the other way around? Why couldn't it be that the Koreans came from the Shang instead?
Буурэг дэрсэнд уурэглэсэн бужин туулай нь ч амгалан Булээн нууранд нь ганганалдсан хотон шувууд нь ч амгалан Буувэй санаа нь ивлэсэн Бусгуй сэптгэл нь ч амгалан хонхон дуутай бойтгийг нь Цэцэг унсэх нь энхрийхэн хöгöн горхины урсгалд нь Цэнгэг хараахай зуггуйхэн Хиртэшгуй ариухан дагшинд нь Монголын узэсгэлэн яруухан

#103 Hansaram

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Posted 03 August 2013 - 11:35 PM

LOL. Wangkon, see what I mean? Claiming the Shang Dynasty to be Korean, claiming Confucius to be Korean. Why can't it be the other way around? Why couldn't it be that the Koreans came from the Shang instead?

Why are you asking me why it couldn't it be it the other way around?


Edited by Hansaram, 03 August 2013 - 11:37 PM.


#104 YummYakitori

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 12:28 AM

Why are you asking me why it couldn't it be it the other way around?


Why couldn't they be native Chinese speakers who are bilingual? Why must the rulers of Shang be Korean and not Huaxia (Han Chinese)? Isn't it obvious your opinion is biased towards your own ethnic race, but that's just a more pleasant way of saying you are a Korean nationalist.

Besides, if the Shang Dynasty people were actually Koreans, why did they write using the ancient Chinese oracle bone script (甲骨文), the predecessor of Hanja (漢字 / 한자)?

When Hanja (漢字 / 한자) was exported to Korea, the Koreans had such a hard time exploiting the Hanja script, it is obvious the oracle bone script, or Hanzi/Hanja is not created to suit the native Korean language.

Not everyone from the Shang royalty migrated to Korea, there was only one member of the royalty, with 5,000 other servants, - Jizi (箕子) / Gija (기자), who migrated to Korea in 1122 BC and set up the Gija Joseon Dynasty (箕子朝鮮 / 기자조선).

Jizi was actually the paternal uncle of the last king of Shang, so TBH although he had some Shang royalty blood, he wasn't the king. Also fascinating is the fact that Jizi's given name was Xuyu / Seoyeo (胥餘 / 서여). Take this to reference with Fuyu / Buyeo (扶餘 / 부여).

"Jizi brought agriculture, sericulture, and many other facets of Chinese civilization to Joseon."

Later on, another Chinese general, Wiman (衛滿) would come to Korea and set up his own dynasty in 108 BC.
Буурэг дэрсэнд уурэглэсэн бужин туулай нь ч амгалан Булээн нууранд нь ганганалдсан хотон шувууд нь ч амгалан Буувэй санаа нь ивлэсэн Бусгуй сэптгэл нь ч амгалан хонхон дуутай бойтгийг нь Цэцэг унсэх нь энхрийхэн хöгöн горхины урсгалд нь Цэнгэг хараахай зуггуйхэн Хиртэшгуй ариухан дагшинд нь Монголын узэсгэлэн яруухан

#105 YummYakitori

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Posted 04 August 2013 - 01:49 AM

Also interesting, is the Four Guardians (四象) of Chinese astrology found on the tomb murals of Goguryeo (高句麗). There are four guardians in traditional Chinese constellations, namely;

- Azure Dragon 青龍 (Qinglong; Green Dragon)
- Vermilion Bird 朱雀 (Zhuque; Red Raven/Crow)
- White Tiger 白虎 (Baihu)
- Black Tortoise 玄武 (Xuanwu)

The drawing of the "Azure Dragon" constellation on the tomb murals of Goguryeo:
http://www.ja168.net...26644721008.jpg

The drawing of the "Vermilion Bird" constellation on the tomb murals of Goguryeo:
http://pic.caixin.co...4657_vhXkQE.jpg
http://img5.blogs.ya...1458_28267509_0

The drawing of the "White Tiger" constellation on the tomb murals of Goguryeo:
http://www2u.biglobe...kiga/byakko.jpg

The drawing of the "Black Tortoise" constellation on the tomb murals of Goguryeo:
http://blog-imgs-36-...150745485f2.jpg
Буурэг дэрсэнд уурэглэсэн бужин туулай нь ч амгалан Булээн нууранд нь ганганалдсан хотон шувууд нь ч амгалан Буувэй санаа нь ивлэсэн Бусгуй сэптгэл нь ч амгалан хонхон дуутай бойтгийг нь Цэцэг унсэх нь энхрийхэн хöгöн горхины урсгалд нь Цэнгэг хараахай зуггуйхэн Хиртэшгуй ариухан дагшинд нь Монголын узэсгэлэн яруухан




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