Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

Okinawa (Ryukyu) Independence?


  • Please log in to reply
59 replies to this topic

#31 Shadowfax

Shadowfax

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 259 posts

Posted 14 June 2005 - 04:24 PM

I am here snowybeagle! :greetblink:

Though I'm not very interested in Hawaiian history, I was "forced to" take it during middle school and in high school freshman year. -_- I've read multiple accounts on how Hawaii was annexed by the US.

I haven't read the whole thread, so I'll just respond to the issue of US annexation of Hawii, and how it eventually becomes a state. What Gubook Janggoon said is basically true.

Even when the Hawaiian monarchy still exists, the plantation owners (most of them are the sons of the missionaries) had much influence to it. There was a periond in which sugar cane (hawaii's major export industry) is tax free in the US. But later US decides to drop its treaty with Hawaii, taking away the free tax on its exports, so that the plantation owners no longer make as much money as they do. Some of them even have trouble keeping their company alive. The owners are mad at the monarchy for doing nothing to help them. This is one major reason why monarchy is overthrew.

I've to go somewhere now...I'll post later about the annextion part.

#32 snowybeagle

snowybeagle

    Sentinel of the Southern Star (鎮南星)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 5,197 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Singapore
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History

Posted 14 June 2005 - 08:14 PM

Thanks for the input, Shadowfax.
Looking forward to more inputs from you.

#33 Shadowfax

Shadowfax

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 259 posts

Posted 14 June 2005 - 09:28 PM

Ok I'm back. Here the story continues...

There appears a missionary/businessmen group, the Hawaiian League, who plotted to overthrow the monarchy. They use their influences to slowly lessen the power of the monarch and the Hawaiian people in general. The Bayonet Constitution takes away the voting right of most Hawaiians, but it gives voting rights to non-hawaii-citizen Amercians. This is brought to the attention of Queen Liliuokalani. She then tries to make a new constitution that restores power to her and her people. She calls on the Hawaiian people to support her. Unfortunately, by the time Hawaiian don't have much political influence as the Americans occupy all the importatn positions. Not only the law is voted down in the legislature, but it also alerts the Hawaiian League. They decide to take some action.

They obtain support from the American Minister John Stevens, who sends American marines ashore to dethrone the Queen. This is done without the authorization of the US Congress and the President. Queen Liliuokalani agrees to step down even though the Hawaiian population says it will protect her; she agrees because she believes the US government will eventually restore her monarchy.

However, the Hawaiian League is quick to establish a provisional government and asks the US to annex Hawaii. President Cleveland refuses. He thinks the take-over is illegal and demands the Queen to be restored. The provisional government in its turn refuses. Cleveland then does nothing because he does not want to send troops to fight Amercians. Hawaii is annexed when President McKinley takes office.

Edited by Shadowfax, 14 June 2005 - 09:29 PM.


#34 Yun

Yun

    Sage-King

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 9,057 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Singapore/USA
  • Interests:Ancient Chinese history, with a focus on the Age of Fragmentation. Chinese ethnicities, religion, philosophy, music, and art and material culture. Military history in general.
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Three Kingdoms, Age of Fragmentation, Sui-Tang

Posted 14 June 2005 - 09:37 PM

Classic case of the tail wagging the dog? The Japanese army later did the same in China - it was called Gekkokujo (the low controlling the high).
The dead have passed beyond our power to honour or dishonour them, but not beyond our ability to try and understand.

#35 Shadowfax

Shadowfax

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 259 posts

Posted 14 June 2005 - 09:37 PM

From what I have seen and read, the Hawaiians are not looking for actually independence. They want to be treated like how native Americans are, with previleges. :)

Edited by Shadowfax, 14 June 2005 - 09:38 PM.


#36 Hang Li Po

Hang Li Po

    State Undersecretary (Shangshu Lang 尚书郎)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 677 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Cheras, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)
  • Languages spoken:Bahasa Melayu, English
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Malaysian
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Asian History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Malai Ren, Malai Yun, Mo-lo-yu, Molo-yoou, Mali-yu-eul, Ma-lo-yu, Mo Lou Yu, Mo Lo Yu, Mo Lou Y, Mo Lou Yuu, Ma Li Yi Er, Ma La Yu, Wu Lai Yu & Wu Lai Yu, Malaysian History, Islamic History, Chinese Muslim History, Japanese Muslim History

Posted 15 June 2005 - 10:34 PM

Never underestimate what revivals of nationalism or ancient traditions/ways could do.

History is replete with examples of conquered/annexed people breaking off to get independence, using such pretexts.

Confirmed
Ireland.
Scandanavia - Finland, Norway.
Baltic states - Lithuania, Estonia, Latvia
Former USSR - Ukraine (once the heartlands of the Russians, longer than Ryuku/Okiwana had been Japanese)
East Timor
Vietnam
Now defunct Turkish Empire - Greece, Albania, Israel etc, also longer than Okinawa had been Japanese

Not confirmed
Tibet
Taiwan
Hawaii
Wales
Scotland
Basque
Catalonia

Yes, present day Okinawa is very much integrated into Japanese culture, but it still retains its distinctiveness and no one can tell what will happen.

If it happens in the future, scholars and commentators would suddenly point to various aspects from the past (including today) as indicators that the causes for independence had been there all these while.

View Post


Not confirmed

Pattani (Southern Thailand}

Aceh (Indonesia)

Mindanao (Southern Philipine)

Edited by Hang Li Po, 15 June 2005 - 10:35 PM.

TOO PHAT feat YASIN - ALHAMDULILLAH (ENGLISH VERSION)


#37 snowybeagle

snowybeagle

    Sentinel of the Southern Star (鎮南星)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 5,197 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Singapore
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History

Posted 15 June 2005 - 10:51 PM

[Not confirmed]

Karen (Myanmar), ceasefire agreement after the 1948-2004 armed conflicts.

(West) Papua (Indonesia)

Kurdistan (straddling more than one country)

East Turkestan (China)

Tamil Eelam (Sri Lanka)

Flanders (Belgium)

Wallonia (Belgium)

Breizh (Brittany, France)

Chechnya (Russia)

Cornwall (England, UK)

Quebec (Canada)

Chiapas (Mexico)

And the list goes on ...

No shortage of people all over the world striving for autonomy or independence.

#38 mohistManiac

mohistManiac

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 3,576 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese Mythology
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    none

Posted 03 February 2010 - 02:50 PM

I am wondering how is Okinawan or Ryukyuan culture different from the rest of Japan. Is it to the same degree of differentiation of say for instance Taiwan is from mainland Fujian. From my uncle I also heard rumor of a Guangdong independence movement in the works and that like Tibet or Xinjiang they are planning to 造反 or become rebellious.
I have the fortune of living in the part of the world which has use for toilet paper, but not douches.

#39 Chanpuru

Chanpuru

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 275 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Okinawa

Posted 03 February 2010 - 08:34 PM

I am wondering how is Okinawan or Ryukyuan culture different from the rest of Japan. Is it to the same degree of differentiation of say for instance Taiwan is from mainland Fujian. From my uncle I also heard rumor of a Guangdong independence movement in the works and that like Tibet or Xinjiang they are planning to 造反 or become rebellious.


I'm not too familiar with the differences between Taiwan and Fujian but I would imagine the distance is deeper because Taiwanese and Fujianese are still within the Minnan "dialect" of Chinese.

Also you have to keep in mind that prior to annexation of the Ryukyu Kingdom by Japan in the 19th century, the islands of the Ryukyu were a separate country, and thus have a separate history. To be even more specific, each of the islands also have a separate history because they were conquered by force during the Ryukyu Kingdom period. The dominant island is Okinawa (or Uchina in the Okinawan language), so there's a tendency for outsiders to associate Ryukyu with Okinawa, yet the other islands have their own distinctiveness.

Language wise, all of the languages spoken in the Ryukyus are part of the Japonic family along with standard Japanese. Sometimes its difficult (and very political) to define the line between a dialect and a language, but I believe it was UNESCO that once stated that there are 8 endangered languages of Japan, of which 6 are in the Ryukyus (you can read more here http://www.britannic...guages-of-Japan )

Linguists often like to say that the Ryukyuan family of languages and the Japanese family of languages split around 2,000 years ago (similar to the time when Hungarian and Finnish split from each other).

As a result there's very significant differences. I guess if I had to make a comparison, it would be something like English vs Russian. and that the relation between Shuri-Naha Okinawan (the dominant language spoken in the Ryukyus), versus what is spoken in Yonaguni, Miyako, etc would be like Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, etc). This is why that when reading one of the Ryukyuan languages and Japanese language, you can see the relation, but you can see significant differences. During the early 20th century, Japanese politicians purposely tried to classify the Ryukyuan languages as a dialect of Japanese, yet it is too different to be a dialect (I would argue its the same on those who argue cantonese and mandarin are dialects of each other, but are really separate but related languages).

These days, due to attempted assimilation policies in the early 20th century, the use of Ryukyuan languages died out. During WWII, Okinawan soldiers who spoke their native languages were killed as the Japanese assumed they were spying on them. So even though the Japanese at the time, considered Okinawans as Japanese, at the same time they didn't, often placing them as 2nd tier races with other East Asians (often exhibitions on Okinawa are grouped with Taiwanese and Koreans). There's a revival going on. One popular guy is Byron Fija (Fija is the native Okinawan pronunciation of Higa, an Okinawan surname). He's half American but is famous because he speaks only Okinawan. he has many youtube videos where he teaches Okinawan language lessons.

As far as culture goes.. the Ryukyuan islands developed much more slowly than the south-west of Japan which established earlier contact with Korean and Chinese kingdoms and as a result, Okinawa and the other islands were stuck in the shellmound stage far longer than Japan did. its unsure when exactly, but Okinawa experienced rapid development and began catching up with Japan. This is usually attributed to the beginning of contact with China, but there are theories that contacts in SE Asia were very significant. Usually its associated with the Ming, but there's evidence that it started much earlier as the Yuan did try to invade Okinawa during the city-states period, and the island by that time already showed influences from China. So it is likely that the exchange occurred around the late Song at earliest.

Its usually said that the Chinese dynasty that had the most influence on Japan is the Tang. In Okinawa's case its usually the Ming, as Okinawa began contact with China later. In addition much of these contacts were strictly centered on Fuzhou because that was the only port of entry China allowed the Okinawans to come through. Okinawa was also active in trade with Siam, Java and Malacca, so there's significant cultural influences from there too. Okinawa attempted to look northwards towards Korea and there are documents that Okinawa and Korea were highly interested in establishing close links with each other, but Japanese pirates around the Tsushima prevent such a relationship from developing. Some Korean anthropologists believe that the Sambyeolcho who resisted the Mongols, fled from Jeju-do to Okinawa (its relatively close) and influenced some of the development.

#40 qrasy

qrasy

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 4,722 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Biology, Languages, Ethnicity, History, etc.
  • Languages spoken:Mandarin Chinese, Indonesian, English, Cantonese
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Han Chinese (Southeastern)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Other Interests
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Linguistics

Posted 03 February 2010 - 11:11 PM

I'm not too familiar with the differences between Taiwan and Fujian but I would imagine the distance is deeper because Taiwanese and Fujianese are still within the Minnan "dialect" of Chinese.

Taiwanese Min and South Fujianese are intelligible (i.e. they can communicate in their native languages, in spoken form). The Minnan people only came to Taiwan last few centuries.

Linguists often like to say that the Ryukyuan family of languages and the Japanese family of languages split around 2,000 years ago (similar to the time when Hungarian and Finnish split from each other).

That is a big difference, as the time put it to be similar to Mandarin vs Fujianese.
The divergence between Cantonese and Mandarin is said to date back to around Tang dynasty, though.

He's half American but is famous because he speaks only Okinawan. he has many youtube videos where he teaches Okinawan language lessons.

It appears, though, that he speaks Standard Japanese as well.
For example when he translate "Gusuyo" to "Minna sama".

In Okinawa's case its usually the Ming, as Okinawa began contact with China later.

I heard (rumours) that, during the Japanese invasion of China, when the US was fighting against Japanese, US leaders asked Chiang Kai-Shek if he wanted to regain Ryukyu as it was a Chinese tributary state (since Ming?) then he said he'd rather want Mongolia; and that later it resulted in the dispute of Senkaku/Diaoyutai island(s).

Edited by qrasy, 03 February 2010 - 11:15 PM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#41 Chanpuru

Chanpuru

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 275 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Okinawa

Posted 04 February 2010 - 01:42 AM

Taiwanese Min and South Fujianese are intelligible (i.e. they can communicate in their native languages, in spoken form). The Minnan people only came to Taiwan last few centuries.

That is a big difference, as the time put it to be similar to Mandarin vs Fujianese.
The divergence between Cantonese and Mandarin is said to date back to around Tang dynasty, though.

It appears, though, that he speaks Standard Japanese as well.
For example when he translate "Gusuyo" to "Minna sama".

I heard (rumours) that, during the Japanese invasion of China, when the US was fighting against Japanese, US leaders asked Chiang Kai-Shek if he wanted to regain Ryukyu as it was a Chinese tributary state (since Ming?) then he said he'd rather want Mongolia; and that later it resulted in the dispute of Senkaku/Diaoyutai island(s).


Yes you are right in that Byron speaks standard Japanese (he has to know it since he grew up there), however in real life he seems to stick only to Shuri-Naha Okinawan. Supposedly the rumor among other Okinawans is that he started only to speak it because he was always picked on for being mixed, and then began teaching himself to speak Okinawan (via his grandparents conversations) and using it most of the time.

As far as the second part. Probably just a rumor. As far as land exchanges goes involving China and Japan, there were two in recent history. The first was during the late Qing period when the Qing and Japan considered splitting Okinawa, with China taking some of the southern islands and Japan taking some of the northern ones, leaving one island to be independent. This of course never went through as Japan decided to keep all of them. (I also doubt any Okinawans would be happy being split up like that either). The next was after WWII when the allies considered carving up Japan into zones like Berlin. However in this proposal, Shikoku was considered for China. Okinawa would be and was under US control for over 20 years. There are several documents prior to 1945 which stated US intentions on taking over the island before the battle of Okinawa. Its geographic position next to Taiwan, close to the Koreas and S.E Asia is considered of major military importance for the Americans and one of the reasons they are unwilling to leave.

#42 mumbaki

mumbaki

    Military Commissioner (Jiedushi 节度使)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 95 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Asian History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    SE Asian History

Posted 24 February 2010 - 09:32 AM

Tohoku-kotoba,Shikoku-kotoba,Kanto-kotoba,Kansai-kotoba/Western Japanese,Satsugu-kotoba and Kyushu ben,I think will be considered a languages if the european standard of classifying languages are used,if the christianization of kyushu succeeded in the 16th century i doubt it that the Kyushuben and Satsumaben speaking areas will be a part of japan and I think if they were partitioned from japan they will not want to unify with the other japanese....

Hachijo-kotoba is lately considered now as a endangered language like the ryukyu..
Kansai-kotoba and Kanto-kotoba are the dominant languages or dialects in japan but hyojungo based on Kanto-kotoba is official.

What I know is that Tohogu-Kotoba is not endangered but both Kyushu Kotoba,Shikoku Kotoba and Satsuma Kotoba are quite endangered but less endangered than those of Hachijo and Ryukyu but Shikoku Kotoba,Kyushu Kotoba and Satsuma Kotoba I think will most likely die after the Ryukyuan and Hachijo has died of but people will not know of the death of those languages.


The /ɸ/ to /h/ sound change though did not occur until sometime after Late Middle Japanese, and it's possible that this change originated around Kyoto (though feel free to correct me). As such, it shouldn't come as a surprise if Kyushu is one of the last affected regions. If no longer an independant phoneme, [ɸ] may remain preserved in a number of words in these dialects. Some examples from Kagoshima include futotsu for hitotsu, fai for hari, chenofara for tenohiri, fuyeme (enkame), faye for hare, etc. - Io Katai (talk) 04:23, 6 November 2009 (UTC)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk:Ryukyuan_languages#Kagoshima_Ben_and_Ryukyuan

Satsuma-ben also preserved the /f/ sound.

I think if Japan allows for a Ryukyu republic later a Satsuma republic,Kyushu republic,Tohoku/Tohogu-Hokkiado republic and Hachijo republic will also pop up perhaps Kansai too will secede from Kanto I mean japan can balkanize because of that, I think japan should decentralize and allow the other regions other than Kanto to have some autonomy like spain or russia to eliminate this problem.

Hachijo language already has split before Okinawan split from old japanese but Hachijo language got influenced by standard japanese like what is happening on ryukyu languages.

Edited by mumbaki, 24 February 2010 - 08:17 PM.


#43 Chanpuru

Chanpuru

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 275 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Okinawa

Posted 02 March 2010 - 03:22 PM

Tohoku-kotoba,Shikoku-kotoba,Kanto-kotoba,Kansai-kotoba/Western Japanese,Satsugu-kotoba and Kyushu ben,I think will be considered a languages if the european standard of classifying languages are used,if the christianization of kyushu succeeded in the 16th century i doubt it that the Kyushuben and Satsumaben speaking areas will be a part of japan and I think if they were partitioned from japan they will not want to unify with the other japanese....

Hachijo-kotoba is lately considered now as a endangered language like the ryukyu..
Kansai-kotoba and Kanto-kotoba are the dominant languages or dialects in japan but hyojungo based on Kanto-kotoba is official.

What I know is that Tohogu-Kotoba is not endangered but both Kyushu Kotoba,Shikoku Kotoba and Satsuma Kotoba are quite endangered but less endangered than those of Hachijo and Ryukyu but Shikoku Kotoba,Kyushu Kotoba and Satsuma Kotoba I think will most likely die after the Ryukyuan and Hachijo has died of but people will not know of the death of those languages.



http://en.wikipedia....en_and_Ryukyuan

Satsuma-ben also preserved the /f/ sound.

I think if Japan allows for a Ryukyu republic later a Satsuma republic,Kyushu republic,Tohoku/Tohogu-Hokkiado republic and Hachijo republic will also pop up perhaps Kansai too will secede from Kanto I mean japan can balkanize because of that, I think japan should decentralize and allow the other regions other than Kanto to have some autonomy like spain or russia to eliminate this problem.

Hachijo language already has split before Okinawan split from old japanese but Hachijo language got influenced by standard japanese like what is happening on ryukyu languages.


I think you should actually read the dissertation written by Shimabukuro rather than just quoting some of the discussion on Wikipedia. I've personally met him where he now teaches at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa. Secondly, while currently the Kanto dialect has much dominance, and Kansai in its own region, it does not mean the other dialects of standard Japanese such as those in Tohoku, Hokkaido, etc are diminished. They are still pretty strong. Go to Aomori and people from Kanto may have some trouble. Hachijo is still considered a dialect of Japanese, but is the most divergent and unintelligible perhaps due to long periods of isolation.
Secondly there is no Ryukyuan language, but Ryukyuan languages, there is more than one and they are quite different from each other, yet more related with each other when compared to mainland Japanese. Indeed there are many aspects found in these languages that once existed in Japanese that were spoken in Kyushu.

Secondly, a Balkanization on Japan based on Kansai, Kyushu, Hachijo areas? extremely unlikely, and you are simply assuming and confusing that all dialectal differences are synonymous with political autonomous or separatist movements. While people in Kansai, Kyushu, etc may have strong pride in their regional identity and dialects, they still consider themselves as Japanese, many Japanese politicians hail from those areas, etc. Its as likely as Pusan wanting to separate from South Korea, etc. Many countries have many dialects of the same language as well as areas that have their own regional identity. Its not something unique to Japan. The only groups within modern Japan that has pushed for more autonomy or separation are primarily those in Okinawa and some of the smaller Ainu groups. There has been nothing from Hachijo. Please be more realistic.

#44 mumbaki

mumbaki

    Military Commissioner (Jiedushi 节度使)

  • Master Scholar (Juren)
  • 95 posts
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Asian History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    SE Asian History

Posted 06 March 2010 - 05:45 AM

I think you should actually read the dissertation written by Shimabukuro rather than just quoting some of the discussion on Wikipedia. I've personally met him where he now teaches at the University of the Ryukyus in Okinawa. Secondly, while currently the Kanto dialect has much dominance, and Kansai in its own region, it does not mean the other dialects of standard Japanese such as those in Tohoku, Hokkaido, etc are diminished. They are still pretty strong. Go to Aomori and people from Kanto may have some trouble. Hachijo is still considered a dialect of Japanese, but is the most divergent and unintelligible perhaps due to long periods of isolation.
Secondly there is no Ryukyuan language, but Ryukyuan languages, there is more than one and they are quite different from each other, yet more related with each other when compared to mainland Japanese. Indeed there are many aspects found in these languages that once existed in Japanese that were spoken in Kyushu.

Secondly, a Balkanization on Japan based on Kansai, Kyushu, Hachijo areas? extremely unlikely, and you are simply assuming and confusing that all dialectal differences are synonymous with political autonomous or separatist movements. While people in Kansai, Kyushu, etc may have strong pride in their regional identity and dialects, they still consider themselves as Japanese, many Japanese politicians hail from those areas, etc. Its as likely as Pusan wanting to separate from South Korea, etc. Many countries have many dialects of the same language as well as areas that have their own regional identity. Its not something unique to Japan. The only groups within modern Japan that has pushed for more autonomy or separation are primarily those in Okinawa and some of the smaller Ainu groups. There has been nothing from Hachijo. Please be more realistic.

Yes,Ryukyuan idioms are separate languages and far to Mainland Japanese as spanish is related to italian the same can be said for Hachijo...

Yes, there is currently no sentiment like that in mainland japan but the truth is the difference between japanese groups are like that of iberian languages,such as castillian, galician-portuguese and leonese,eastern japanese(Tohoku-Kanto) and western japanese are closer to each other as Andalucian and Castillian Spanish but Kyushu ben and Satsuma Ben are as similar to Standard Japanese as spanish is different from portuguese and leonese, when some of the japanese study the romance languages of say such countries such as spain they don't use the language/dialect debate on intelligibility nor philogists ever touched the mainland japanese dialects but there are studies on intelligibility of Japanese dialects.

Before the AsturLeonese knew their identity they were in the same mentality as the people in kyushu maybe if they know their true identity they will have an independence movement.

Edited by mumbaki, 17 March 2010 - 12:16 PM.


#45 Johan

Johan

    Prefect (Taishou 太守)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 15 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Jakarta, Indonesia
  • Interests:Chinese history, Korean and Japanese History
    Main interest in Sword arts of the China, Korea and Japan.
    Practitioner of Haidong Gumdo ( Korean Sword Art )
  • Languages spoken:English
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Chinese
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese History
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    none

Posted 26 December 2010 - 11:18 AM

Most of my knowledge on Ryukyuan history is from the internet wikipedia.
In my opinion, they have a very interesting history and culture that interlinked to their neighbours.
However if ever there is a thought of independence, I doubt it is easy to do so, they are now so closely linked to Japanese Mainland and economicaly not feasible to split them apart. It creates more pain for the rest of Ryukyuans, if ever something closer to independence probably an autonomous region with separate goverment from Tokyo central government, into some kind of loose federation but the Foreign affairs and Military issues will still be in the hands of Central Government.




2 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users


    Bing (1)