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Did Cao-Cao "really" make 72 graveyards?


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#1 reizer

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 09:38 AM

..mmm...more topic...(^v^)...I read in novel <I forgot the chapter>, it said that Cao-Cao want to make 72 graveyard <with his name, same size, same form>when he almost die...did they really made 72 graveyards for cao-cao after his death??? where's the location?? Was it intact till now??..thx very much....xie-xie....

#2 Yun

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 11:09 AM

For a long time since the Song dynasty, it was believed that the many tombs at Ci county north of Ye were the 72 fake tombs of Cao Cao. But in the late Qing, grave steles were unearthed that showed that they were tombs of Eastern Wei and Northern Qi emperors, aristocrats, and ministers. More than 10 have been excavated since the 1970s. There are still 123 un-excavated tombs in the area. Those that have been identified include the tombs of Gao Huan, Gao Yang, Gao Changgong (the famous Prince of Lanling), and the young Rouran princess who married Gao Zhan (who was then still a prince) but died soon after.

The legend of Cao Cao's fake tombs probably originated in the Song (there is a poem about them) and became popularised by the RTK novel in the Ming.
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#3 Liu Bei

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 06:00 PM

I believe that Cao Cao do have 72 fake tomes.
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#4 Ma Chao

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 07:35 PM

what was his purpose? was he a hatred figure?

#5 sima old bandit

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Posted 09 August 2005 - 09:39 PM

I think in folklore it was to reinforce the idea of him being a villain?

Since he was a frugal person it does seem excessive.

#6 norenxaq

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 02:19 AM

[quote name='Yun' date='Aug 9 2005, 09:09 AM']
For a long time since the Song dynasty, it was believed that the many tombs at Ci county north of Ye were the 72 fake tombs of Cao Cao. But in the late Qing, grave steles were unearthed that showed that they were tombs of Eastern Wei and Northern Qi emperors, aristocrats, and ministers. More than 10 have been excavated since the 1970s. There are still 123 un-excavated tombs in the area. Those that have been identified include the tombs of Gao Huan, Gao Yang, Gao Changgong (the famous Prince of Lanling), and the young Rouran princess who married Gao Zhan (who was then still a prince) but died soon after.

What was her name? how was she related to the Rouran royal family?


How were these Gaos related to each other, if at all?

thank-you

#7 Yun

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 07:19 AM

What was her name? how was she related to the Rouran royal family?
How were these Gaos related to each other, if at all?

Gao Huan was the father of Gao Cheng, Gao Yang, Gao Yan, and Gao Zhan. Gao Cheng was de facto ruler of the Eastern Wei after Gao Huan's death, and soon after Gao Cheng's assassination by a southern POW, Gao Yang deposed the Eastern Wei emperor and founded the Northern Qi. Gao Yang was succeeded by his son Gao Yin, but his brothers Gao Yan and Gao Zhan deposed Gao Yin and made Gao Yan the emperor. Gao Yan died soon after from a riding accident, and Gao Zhan became emperor. Gao Zhan's son Gao Wei was the last real ruler of the Northern Qi, although he abdicated the throne to his young son Gao Heng shortly before the conquest of the state by the Northern Zhou.

Gao Changgong, also known as Gao Xiaoguan and Gao Su, was the fourth son of Gao Cheng. He was a skilled and popular general and known for his good looks (which he woul hide with a mask in battle), but Gao Wei was jealous of him and persecuted him, leading to his death from illness.

When Gao Zhan was 7 years old, in 542, Gao Huan secured for him a marriage with Chidilian, the daughter of the Rouran crown prince Anluochen (son of the kaghan Anagui). She was given the title of Princess Linghe, and was only 4 years old at the time. The princess died in 550 at the young age of 13. Gao Zhan then took as a new wife a Lady Hu who eventually became empress after he succeeded to the Northern Qi throne.

Gao Zhan's marriage to Chidilian came one year after Gao Huan had opened a marriage alliance with the Rouran by sending the Eastern Wei Princess Le'an (of the Tuoba/Yuan Xianbei imperial clan) to be the wife of their crown prince Anluochen.

In 545, the marriage alliance was made even stronger by the marriage of kaghan Anagui's daughter to Gao Huan himself. At that time, the Rouran were in the midst of forming an alliance with the Northern Zhou to attack the Qi, and Gao Huan sought to forestall this by sending an envoy to request a Rouran princess as bride for his heir Gao Cheng. Anagui replied that he would only agree to a marriage of his daughter to Gao Huan himself. On the urging of Gao Cheng and his own wife Lou Zhaojun, Gao Huan agreed to this after some hesitation. The princess arrived escorted by her brother Tutujia, who had been given instructions to return only when the princess had borne Gao Huan a child. The princess was an austere person of few words, and a skilled archer who could bring a bird down with a single shot. Gao Huan was then old and prone to illness (he would die in 547), and could not have sexual relations with the princess, but Tutujia made a scene about this and Gao Huan was forced to ride to the princess' chambers in a carriage. But at the time of Gao Huan's death in 547, the princess had still not become pregnant. Gao Cheng then followed the Rouran custom (which was also a custom of other steppe peoples) and took the princess as a concubine. She eventually bore him a daughter.

what was his purpose? was he a hatred figure?


The main reason was originally thought to be to avoid his tomb being looted by robbers, but the novel twisted this to imply that he feared his tomb being destroyed by his enemies.
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#8 norenxaq

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 10:52 AM

[quote name='Yun' date='Aug 10 2005, 05:19 AM']



When Gao Zhan was 7 years old, in 542, Gao Huan secured for him a marriage with Chidilian, the daughter of the Rouran crown prince Anluochen (son of the kaghan Anagui). She was given the title of Princess Linghe, and was only 4 years old at the time. The princess died in 550 at the young age of 13. Gao Zhan then took as a new wife a Lady Hu who eventually became empress after he succeeded to the Northern Qi throne.

Gao Zhan's marriage to Chidilian came one year after Gao Huan had opened a marriage alliance with the Rouran by sending the Eastern Wei Princess Le'an (of the Tuoba/Yuan Xianbei imperial clan) to be the wife of their crown prince Anluochen.


what were Hu and Le'an's ancestries?

#9 Yun

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Posted 10 August 2005 - 12:20 PM

Gao Zhan's Empress Hu was the daughter of Hu Yanzhi of Anding prefecture. Her mother was daughter of Lu Daoyue from the prestigious Fanyang Lu clan.

As for the ancestry of Princess Le'an, after some thorough searching, I think I may have nailed it. The Bei Shi says that Princess Le'an (who was re-titled Senior Princess of Lanling Prefecture upon her marriage to Anluochen) was a younger sister of Yuan Zhi, the Prince of Changshan. It is recorded that in 526, the Duke of Guangchuan County, Yuan Shao, was promoted to Prince of Changshan. Yuan Shao's tomb stele, unearthed in recent years, indicates that he was the second son of Yuan Yi, son of Yuan Hong (Emperor Xiaowen). Yuan Shao was thus the uncle of the Eastern Wei emperor Yuan Shanjian (who was the son of Yuan Yi's elder son Yuan Tan), and Yuan Zhi was his son and Princess Le'an his daughter. This makes Princess Le'an the emperor's cousin.

Yuan Zhi also had a younger brother Yuan Yao who was enfeoffed as Prince of Chen prefecture in 539. Since Yuan Shao is still referred to as the Prince of Changshan in 539, we can infer that in 541, Yuan Zhi had newly succeeded to the fief on his father's death.
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