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Kingdom of Dali


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#1 Guest_hihi_*

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 03:15 PM

I want to know more about Dali. Thanks

#2 Chiang Kai-shek

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 03:28 PM

I want to know more about Dali. Thanks

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Da Li Guo was a kingdom created by a Chinese man from Wu Wei who threw the Nan Zhao in 937. It was mainly consisted of the Bai tribes and it was destroyed by the Mongols in 1274.

It is famous for Liu Mai Sheng Jian practised by the royal Duan family.
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#3 Miborovsky

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Posted 20 August 2005 - 10:53 PM

It is famous for Liu Mai Sheng Jian practised by the royal Duan family.

That's Jinyong, dude.
All characters and events in the above post -- even those based on real people -- are entirely fictional, and as such, should not be taken seriously, except in a fictional way. All facts are fabricated... poorly. This post contains extreme neo-contraantidisestablishmentarian political ideas and due to its contents it should not be viewed by anyone. The author is not responsible for any emotional stress, physical harm, international tensions or global thermonuclear war that may result from viewing this post.

#4 Yun

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 07:07 AM

I bought a whole book about the history of Dali in Yunnan last year. The author says that there are three versions in the sources about the origin of the Duan ruling house:

1) It was a native aboriginal clan from the Ailao mountians

2) They were descended from the Chu general Zhuang Qiao who founded the state of Dian, the first known political entity in Yunnan

3) They were originally migrants from Wuwei (Guzang) or Tianshui in Gansu, and may have been related to the famous Han Grand Marshal Duan Jiong (who led campaigns against the Qiang tribes).

The author Duan Siming favours the 3rd version as being most credible.
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#5 Snafu

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 11:49 AM

Here's a portion of a late 12th century scroll commissioned by Dali king Duan Zhixing. This pic shows the king worshipping the Buddha. He is surrounded by civil officials (in their high-hats, unique to Dali), at least one military official (the man in the tiger-print robe), servants, and soldiers in their rhino-hide armor. In the background are the 19 peaks of the Tianzeng mts.

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#6 Chiang Kai-shek

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Posted 21 August 2005 - 11:53 AM

That's Jinyong, dude.

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Yes i know but the only thing that Dali is famous for is still Liu Mai Sheng Jian
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#7 Jebe

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Posted 07 December 2005 - 11:14 PM

Maybe This One Could Give More explanation bout Dali Kingdom

List of Dali Kings

1. Duan Siping (893-944)
Chieftain of the Bai tribe in Yunnan, formed a federation of 37 tribes and revolted against the corrupt government. Duan Siping then established the Kingdom of Dali in the year 937, with Dali City as its capitol. Siping was a loyal follower of the Buddhist faith and erected many Buddhist temples during his 8-year reign. After his death Siping was known as the Great Ancestor Holy Martial Civil Emperor.

2. Duan Siying
Son of Siping. Succeeded his father in 944, but in the same year his throne was usurped by his uncle Duan Siliang. Siying was then forced to become a Buddhist monk (Other sources claim that Siying died shortly after becoming king and was succeeded by his uncle). Siying was known as Emperor Wenjing.

3. Duan Siliang (? - 951)
Brother of Siping, uncle of Siying. Usupred his nephew's throne and forced Siying to become a monk. Siliang was titled Holy Compassionate Emperor.

4. Duan Sicong (? - 968)
Son of Siliang. Titled Emperor Guangci.

5. Duan Sushun (? - 985)
Son of Sicong. Emperor Yingdao.

6. Duan Suying (? - 1009)
Son of Sushun. Succeeded his father in 986. Was bestowed the title Loyal King by Emperor Taizong of the Northern Song dynasty. Suying was known as Emperor Shaoming.

7. Duan Sulian (? - 1022)
Son of Suying. Attacked Vietnam in the year 1014 but was defeated. He gained the title of Emperor Jingming. After his death he was succeeded by his nephew, Duan Sulong.

8. Duan Sulong (? - 1041)
Grandson of Suying, nephew of Sulian. Because Sulian's son had already died and his grandson Suzhen was too young, Sulong succeeded the throne in 1022. In 1026, Sulong abdicated the throne in favour of his nephew, heir-apparent Duan Suzhen, and became a monk. He died in 1041 and was titled Emperor Jianyi.

9. Duan Suzhen (? - 1039)
Grandson of Sulian, nephew of Sulong. Succeeded his uncle in the year 1026 and died in 1039 (some sources say that he became a monk in 1041). Emperor Shengde.

10. Duan Suxing (? - 1044?)
Grandson of Suzhen. Succeeded his grandfather because his father had already deceased. Suxing built many palaces and enjoyed luxury, wealth and women. The Dali citizens were unhappy with their king and dethroned Suxing, giving the throne to Prince Duan Silian. Suxing was known as Emperor Tianming.

11. Duan Silian
Great-great grandson of Duan Siping (Great Ancestor). Became King in 1044, due to an uprising of the Dali citizens in which Duan Suxing was dethroned. During his reign, Silian relied heavily on his advisor, Marquis Gao Shengtai. Since then, the power of the Imperial Duan family slowly moved into the hands of the Gao clan. Silian abdicated in 1075 in favour of his son Duan Lianyi in order to become a Buddhist monk. Silian was known as Emperor Xiaode.

12. Duan Lianyi (? - 1080)
Son of Silian. Succeeded his father as King of Dali in 1075, but was killed by minister Yang Yizhen in 1080. Duan Lianyi was known as Emperor Shangde.

NOTE: In JinYong Novels TLBB, Duan Lianyi is the father of Duan Yanqing (Leader of the Four Villains).

13. Duan Shouhui
Nephew of Lianyi. When his uncle was murdered by Yang Yizhen who tried to usurp the throne, the Gao Family attacked Yang and killed him. The head of the Gao Family, Gao Zhisheng, then supported Duan Shouhui to become king in 1080. Shouhui was only a puppet-king, for all the real power lies in the hands of Gao Zhisheng. In the same year, he abdicated in favour of his cousin Duan Zhengming. Shouhui himself became a monk at the Celestial Dragon Temple.

14. Duan Zhengming
Grandson of Duan Silian. Like his cousin Duan Shouhui, Duan Zhengming was a puppet-king who had to listen to Gao Zhisheng. In 1094, he was forced by Gao to become a Buddhist monk. Gao Zhisheng then became king himself. This was the end of the First Dali Duan Dynasty. Zhengming was known as Emperor Baoding.

NOTE: another character that being used in Jin Yong novels TLBB, he is the same Emperor Baoding in TLBB.

15. Duan Zhengchun
Younger brother of Zhengming. After a 2-year reign, Gao Zhisheng told his sons at his deathbed that they should return the throne to the Duan family. So in 1096 after Gao Zhisheng's death, Duan Zhengchun was crowned King of Dali, this was the beginning of the Latter Dali Duan Dynasty. in 1108, Zhengchun became a monk and was succeeded by his son Duan Heyu. Zhengchun was known as Emperor Wenan.

NOTE: Father of Duan Yu, old playboy in TLBB.

16. Duan Zhengyan
Son of Zhengchun. After succeeding his father in 1108, Duan Heyu changed his name into Duan Zhengyan. Duan Zhengyan banned one member of the Gao family who commited a crime, and this man died shortly after. Two servants of this man wanted to avenge their master's death. They planned to assasinate the King on his way to the temple. The plan failed and the two assasins were caught, but Zhengyan respected the two for their loyalty and instead of punishing them, he bestowed them titles and granted them rewards. The two loyal servants refused the King's offer and insisted in dying to serve their master in the afterlife. Zhengyan executed the two assasins and built a tomb to honor these two gentlemen.
In 1116, Zhengyan was granted the title King of Dali by emperor Huizong of the Northern Song.
Zhengyan's sons contended with each other for become heir which sorrowed Zhengyan very much. In order to end his sons' rivalry, Zhengyan abdicated and became a monk in 1147. Duan Zhengyan was known in history as Emperor Xuanren and with his 39-year long reign, he was the longest ruling King of the Dali Empire.

NOTE: Yep, Duan Zhengyan is the historical DUAN YU.

17. Duan Zhengxing
Son of Duan Zhengyan, succeeded his father in 1147. Became a monk in 1172 and abdicated. He was known as Emperor Zhengkang.

18. Duan Zhixing (? - 1200)
Son of Zhengxing. His 28-year long reign was marked by various rebellions and political turmoil. Zhixing died in 1200 and was titled Emperor Gongji.

NOTE: Reverend Yideng of Condor Trilogy.

19. Duan Zhilian (? - 1204)
Son of Zhixing. Ruled for only 4 years and died. He was titled Emperor Xiangtian and was succeeded by his younger brother Zhixiang.

20. Duan Zhixiang (? - 1238?)
Son of Zhixing, younger brother of Zhilian. During his reign, the Kingdom prospered. He was titled Emperor Shenzong after his death in 1238 (some sources claim he became a monk and abdicated).

21. Duan Xiangxing (? - 1251)
Son of Xiangxing. In 1244 the Mongol troops attacked Dali without success. Xiangxing died in 1251 and was titled Emperor Kaoyi.

22. Duan Xingzhi (? - 1260)
Son of Xiangxing, succeeded his father in 1251. In 1253 Khubilai attacked Dali with an army consisting of 100.000. Xingzhi's ministers then killed the Mongolian emissary and hung the body on a tree. Soon, Dali City fell under the attacks of the Mongolian hordes and Xingzhi fled to the south. The next year, he was captured by Mongolian troops. In 1255, Xingzhi and his uncle Duan Fu were brought before Möngke Khan. Xingzhi then presented the map of Dali to the Mongolian Khan and told his plans of governing and pacifying the area. Xingzhi was then bestowed the title of Prince by Möngke and received the supervision over the Yunnan region. Xingzhi and his uncle then returned to Yunnan with Mongolian troops and crushed those tribes that resisted Mongolian rule. Duan Xingzhi then became the first Yuan Governor of Yunnan Province. In 1260, Xingzhi went to Dadu (Beijing) to pay hommage to Emperor Khubilai, but died on his way to the capitol. Duan Xingzhi was the last monarch of the Dali Kingdom, but his descendants remained governers of Yunnan during the Yuan dynasty.


Well, Looks like JinYong really likes to used historical characters from dali to be used in his novels
i just counted he used in mostly in Condor Trilogy novels.

#8 Karakhan

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 01:42 AM

what if Dali never fell to the Mongols? how long would it be able to last before being incorporated to "China" proper?

#9 snowybeagle

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 02:27 AM

what if Dali never fell to the Mongols? how long would it be able to last before being incorporated to "China" proper?

Could you clarify your question?
The region of Yunnan was part of the empires of Qin and Han dynasties.

#10 Yun

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 02:50 AM

what if Dali never fell to the Mongols? how long would it be able to last before being incorporated to "China" proper?


Yang Bin, who recently joined my university's History department, argued in his thesis "Between Winds and Clouds: The Making of Yunnan (Second Century BCE-Twentieth Century CE)" that the Qin and Han conquests of Yunnan were not of an enduring nature, and that if the Ming had not had to invade Yunnan to destroy the stubborn Mongol resistance there (Yunnan was the last part of China to be taken from the Mongols by the Ming), and if the Mongols had not shown Yunnan to be a strategically vital flank for invasion of China from the north, Yunnan might well not have been incorporated into China at all.
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#11 snowybeagle

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 02:58 AM

Yang Bin, who recently joined my university's History department, argued in his thesis "Between Winds and Clouds: The Making of Yunnan (Second Century BCE-Twentieth Century CE)" that the Qin and Han conquests of Yunnan were not of an enduring nature, and that if the Ming had not had to invade Yunnan to destroy the stubborn Mongol resistance there (Yunnan was the last part of China to be taken from the Mongols by the Ming), and if the Mongols had not shown Yunnan to be a strategically vital flank for invasion of China from the north, Yunnan might well not have been incorporated into China at all.

Uhm, history could take the most unexpected paths ... with no respect to what seems to be logical or illogical.
How else could Xinjiang, NE China and Inner Mongolia be explained? Let's not even get started on T----t.

#12 Karakhan

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Posted 16 December 2005 - 04:12 AM

Uhm, history could take the most unexpected paths ... with no respect to what seems to be logical or illogical.
How else could Xinjiang, NE China and Inner Mongolia be explained? Let's not even get started on T----t.


terrain is probably the biggest difference between Yunnan and the other 3. There's not too many ways into Dali, and there's a huge defensive advantage for defenders there. I believe the Mongols got in because of a traitor in Dali's ranks?

then again.. Tibet is pretty rough terrain too..

#13 general_jiang

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 02:11 AM

any map of the location where Dali was?

#14 snowybeagle

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Posted 22 February 2006 - 03:50 AM

any map of the location where Dali was?


http://en.wikipedia....e:China_11b.jpg

This link to a very big map : Posted Image

Edited by snowybeagle, 22 February 2006 - 03:51 AM.


#15 general_jiang

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Posted 27 February 2006 - 09:33 PM

http://en.wikipedia....e:China_11b.jpg

This link to a very big map : Posted Image



Thanks alot for your kind information.




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