Jump to content


Photo
- - - - -

ABO Blood Types & Chinese Ethinicities


  • Please log in to reply
15 replies to this topic

#1 sylvi

sylvi

    Citizen (Shumin 庶民)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 20 September 2005 - 05:08 PM

I'm looking for info about ABO blood types distribution in China, especially amongst the 56 or so Chinese ethinicities, or distribution throughout the different provinces/regions/cities. Is there a north-south or west-east difference between the ABO distribution in China, for instance? I can't read Chinese and there doesn't seem to be much information about this in the English sources that I've looked at. If anyone has any information regarding this at all, it would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.

Edited by sylvi, 20 September 2005 - 05:41 PM.


#2 General_Zhaoyun

General_Zhaoyun

    Grand Valiant General of Imperial Han Army

  • Owner
  • 12,281 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Singapore (Taiwanese/Singapore Permanent Resident)
  • Interests:Chinese History, Chinese Philosophy and Religion, Chinese languages, Minnan/Taiwanese language, Classical Chinese, General Chinese Culture
  • Languages spoken:Mandarin, Taiwanese (Hokkien), English, German, Singlish
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Han Chinese (Taiwanese Hoklo)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    General Chinese Culture
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Language, History and Culture

Posted 20 September 2005 - 09:43 PM

rudeboy or Grand Genealogist are the person to ask..they specializes on blood DNA of ethnicities.
Posted ImagePosted Image

"夫君子之行:靜以修身,儉以養德;非淡泊無以明志,非寧靜無以致遠。" - 諸葛亮

One should seek serenity to cultivate the body, thriftiness to cultivate the morals. If you are not simple and frugal, your ambition will not sparkle. If you are not calm and cool, you will not reach far. - Zhugeliang

#3 kaixin

kaixin

    State Undersecretary (Shangshu Lang 尚书郎)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 618 posts

Posted 21 September 2005 - 12:29 AM

I think B should be a bit more dominant in all of China. But, there are lots of O in southern China too.

#4 sylvi

sylvi

    Citizen (Shumin 庶民)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 28 September 2005 - 04:32 PM

I think B should be a bit more dominant in all of China. But, there are lots of O in southern China too.



Yes. I found a bit of information on this from BloodBook.com (http://www.bloodbook.../world-abo.html).

Chinese-Canton:
O = 46
A = 23
B = 25
AB = 6

Chinese-Peking:
O = 29
A = 27
B = 32
AB = 13

But the rest of China is still a mystery.

#5 qrasy

qrasy

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 4,721 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Biology, Languages, Ethnicity, History, etc.
  • Languages spoken:Mandarin Chinese, Indonesian, English, Cantonese
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Han Chinese (Southeastern)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Other Interests
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Linguistics

Posted 29 September 2005 - 09:21 AM

http://anthro.paloma...vary/vary_3.htm
Is O so high everywhere, that lowest in the chart is 50%-60%?

Edited by qrasy, 29 September 2005 - 09:27 AM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#6 ren

ren

    Grand Tutor (Taifu 太傅)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 311 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Chinese Ethnicities,Peoples
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Anthropology and Genealogy

Posted 04 October 2005 - 10:54 AM

Sorry, GZY, for the late reply. Haven't checked my PM.

I don't have anything on blood types. It isn't really used independently as any type of population affiliation indicator, since it is only one loci (subject to high selection and drift) out of hundreds of traits used now in any single contemporary genetic study. And of course, lineage studies are another type of study favored.

#7 Ed Ziomek

Ed Ziomek

    Imperial Inspector (Jianyushi 监御使)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 176 posts

Posted 04 November 2005 - 08:43 PM

Rudeboy...

Mr. Pseudo Science here... there is an urban legend??? that I have heard, of blood typing among primates, pre-humanoid species...

Or it may be scientifically proven... I certainly have no way of knowing...

That human blood types of O, A, and B show the following parallels...

Chimpanzees... Blood Type A, can never be "B" or "O"

Gorillas... Type B, sometimes A, never O

Baboons... Can be A, B, or O...

How much truth to this? Does it indicate anything at all, or is it pure nonsense?

#8 qrasy

qrasy

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 4,721 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Biology, Languages, Ethnicity, History, etc.
  • Languages spoken:Mandarin Chinese, Indonesian, English, Cantonese
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Han Chinese (Southeastern)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Other Interests
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Linguistics

Posted 05 November 2005 - 07:16 AM

Mr. Pseudo Science Ed Ziomek..
I doubt A B and O in the chimpanzee, gorilla, and baboon refer to the same thing as in humans.. Perhaps just a naming convention...

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#9 TaiE

TaiE

    Grand Guardian (Taibao 太保)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 218 posts
  • Location:Sichuan , China

Posted 05 November 2005 - 08:45 AM

Some believe that the ABO blood type dominate one's personality. Is it really?

There always some companies asked people to tell their own bloodtype,rather annoying.But now people got more clever, whenever it is, write down the O is the best choice.

Edited by TaiE, 05 November 2005 - 08:46 AM.

----草不谢荣于春风 木不怨落于秋天----

#10 Ed Ziomek

Ed Ziomek

    Imperial Inspector (Jianyushi 监御使)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 176 posts

Posted 06 November 2005 - 09:33 AM

Mr. Pseudo Science Ed Ziomek..
I doubt A B and O in the chimpanzee, gorilla, and baboon refer to the same thing as in humans.. Perhaps just a naming convention...

Grasy... You are most-probably right!

Believe me when I tell you... I am in noooooo position to doubt anything that anyone says... I am completely non-academic in this area, and don't have a clue of what I read sometimes, but there IS written material out there, probably referring to the 13 million-years-ago time frame... discussing these issues...

Examples...

http://experts.about...995/3090499.htm

Question from a Korean named "Yangkun"....
"So, could you possibly ask my question about blood type for monkey? Does this animal have different types of blood as we humman beings have? My understanding is that they have two types, Rh+ and Rh-. Any others? "

Answer
"Yangkun,
Actually all blood types found in humans appear in some sort of species of monkey. Which type and which percentage depend on species. The Rh factor is a protein that was first discovered in the Rhesus monkey. 85% of humans have this protein and are Rh+.

Some different animals have different blood types (Dogs have four, cats have 11 and cows have 800) but monkeys have blood types very similar to humans. The chimpanzee has mostly type A blood; sometimes O but never B. Gorillas have ONLY type B blood. Baboons, like humans have A, B and O blood types. It is true that all apes and all humans can be divided into the two blood types Rh+ and Rh- but Rh typing and A,B,O typing are two different ways to type blood. This is true in both humans and primates."
-Steve Whitehead

http://www.owendot.c...lood_Cells.html

"ABH antigens are not only found in humans, but also in various organisms such as bacteria, plants, and animals. ABH substances are present both on red blood cells and in secretions only in humans and some of the apes (chimpanzee, gorilla, orangutan, and gibbon). In all other mammalian species these substances are found only in secretions."

http://facstaff.uwa....f_the_human.htm

"Of the Old World monkeys, the chimpanzee has been the most studied (Socha et al., 1984). Interestingly, they have predominantly blood type A and in rare cases blood type O, but NEVER blood type B (Socha et al., 1984). Most blood systems found in chimpanzees also exist in man, but there are some species specific characteristics. The chimpanzee is thought to be the ancestor of Cro-magnon man.

In contrast to chimpanzees, gorillas have been found to possess ONLY blood type B. Some evolutionary scientists believe the gorilla to be the ancestor of Neanderthal man.

Grasy... this is a great intellectual discussion... possibly my contributions are slightly off-topic, but certainly "food for thought" about our evolution, and cultural migrations... (my opinion)

And my wife will be the first to tell you... I still swing from the trees, I never evolved.

Edited by Ed Ziomek, 06 November 2005 - 09:35 AM.


#11 qrasy

qrasy

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 4,721 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Biology, Languages, Ethnicity, History, etc.
  • Languages spoken:Mandarin Chinese, Indonesian, English, Cantonese
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Han Chinese (Southeastern)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Other Interests
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Linguistics

Posted 07 November 2005 - 01:44 AM

Just forgot something.. :P
The blood types could be true.
Most, if not all, blood types are based in antigenes e.g. Rhesus blood type are based on antigenes found in the blood of rhesus monkey.

Perhaps the A and B antigenes also exist in other primates' blood? (O:no A or B antigenes, AB: have both)
But saying the humans developed from different species feel strange. There is no some specific blood type in some species can come in some possibility.
Human have ABO. But saying human are mix of Chimpanzees and Gorillas? I think once the species have split, there's no way they can converge again.


Some believe that the ABO blood type dominate one's personality. Is it really?

Should not be..

There always some companies asked people to tell their own bloodtype,rather annoying.But now people got more clever, whenever it is, write down the O is the best choice.

If they later find that actually the people are not that blood type.. what will happen? :haha:

Edited by qrasy, 07 November 2005 - 01:50 AM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#12 sylvi

sylvi

    Citizen (Shumin 庶民)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 4 posts

Posted 08 November 2005 - 02:52 AM

http://anthro.paloma...vary/vary_3.htm
Is O so high everywhere, that lowest in the chart is 50%-60%?



It's true that the O allele is by far the most numerous within the world population, and type O is the most common blood type. But since a person needs to inherit *two* O alleles (OO) in order to have type O blood, this blood type is not *quite* as common as it appears. Some people have an O allele but have blood type A or B because they have the alleles combination of OA or OB.


There always some companies asked people to tell their own bloodtype,rather annoying.But now people got more clever, whenever it is, write down the O is the best choice.


Why is O the best choice? :huh:

Edited by sylvi, 08 November 2005 - 03:13 AM.


#13 TMPikachu

TMPikachu

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • CHF Grand Historian Award
  • 2,545 posts

Posted 09 November 2005 - 03:06 PM

I remember reading somewhere that during WWII, an American geneoligist (for propaganda against the Japanese) came up with some theory that whites were mostly a certain bloodtype, while Asians were another, and that asians were inferior for it (something like the 'Asian' bloodtype being more common in animals)

I want to say the 'Asian type' was B, but I can't remember.
"the way has more than one name, and wise men have more than one method. Knowledge is such that it may suit all countries, so that all creatures may be saved..."

#14 qrasy

qrasy

    Emperor (Huangdi 皇帝)

  • CHF Han Lin Scholar
  • 4,721 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Interests:Physics, Chemistry, Maths, Biology, Languages, Ethnicity, History, etc.
  • Languages spoken:Mandarin Chinese, Indonesian, English, Cantonese
  • Ethnic Groups or Race:Han Chinese (Southeastern)
  • Main Interest in CHF:
    Other Interests
  • Specialisation / Expertise:
    Chinese Linguistics

Posted 13 November 2005 - 04:48 AM

You say animal, it could be Rhesus, there are a distinction of Rh+ and Rh-.

Europeans have lots of Rh-, if I recall correctly about 85%. Africans are about 100%. Asian is... I forgot. But definitely more than 50% Rh+.

Edited by qrasy, 13 November 2005 - 04:48 AM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#15 Jet Black

Jet Black

    Citizen (Shumin 庶民)

  • CHF Rookie Member
  • 1 posts

Posted 17 November 2005 - 08:26 AM

"Of the Old World monkeys, the chimpanzee has been the most studied (Socha et al., 1984). Interestingly, they have predominantly blood type A and in rare cases blood type O, but NEVER blood type B (Socha et al., 1984). Most blood systems found in chimpanzees also exist in man, but there are some species specific characteristics. The chimpanzee is thought to be the ancestor of Cro-magnon man.

In contrast to chimpanzees, gorillas have been found to possess ONLY blood type B. Some evolutionary scientists believe the gorilla to be the ancestor of Neanderthal man.


could you mention some scientists who actually think that about cro magnon and neanderthal man? I have certainly never heard of it. Humans did not evolve from any of the other modern great apes, but share a common ancestor with them, most recently with the chimpanzee lineage. The disappearance of the B blood type in chimps, assuming that source there is correct, would have occured after the breaking of the human lineage from the chimp lineage, and similarly the loss of the A type in gorillas would have occured after their split from the human/chimp line. The claim that homo evolved twice, which is essentially what that is claiming there (once from the pan group and once from the gorilla group) is nonsensical.




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users