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#1 Yun

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 01:25 AM

On Snowybeagle's request, here is a translation of some online information about the Pixiu.

貔貅(拼音:p xiū)又名天禄、辟邪。是中国古代神话传说中的一种神兽,龙头、马身、麟脚,形状似狮子,毛色灰白,会飞。貔貅凶猛威武,喜吸食魔怪的精血,并转化为财富,它在天上负责的巡视工作,阻止妖魔鬼怪、瘟疫疾病扰乱天庭。也有一种说法它是龙的第九个儿子。

古时候人们常也用貔貅来作为军队的称呼。传说貔貅触犯天条,玉皇大帝罚他只以四面八方之财为食,吞万物而不泻,可招财聚宝,只进不出,神通特异。现在很多中国人配戴貔貅的玉制品正因如此。
(from http://zh.wikipedia....gory:%...物 )

The Pixiu is also known as the Tianlu (Heavenly Salary) and Bixie (Wards off Evil). It is a magical beast in ancient Chinese mythology with a dragon's head, a horse's body, a qilin's feet, and the overall shape of a lion. Its fur is greyish-white, and it can fly. The Pixiu is fierce and a good fighter, and likes sucking the blood or essence of demons and converting it into wealth. It is tasked with patrolling the heavens and stopping demons and diseases from causing chaos. One version of the legend identifies the Pixiu as the 9th son of the Dragon.

In ancient times, 'the Pixiu' was also used as a synonym for an army (because of its ferocity). One legend does that the Pixiu broke one of the rules of Heaven, and was punished by the Jade Emperor by restricting its food to the wealth all around the world. It could swallow wealth without ever having to defecate. This ability to gain wealth without letting it out was auspicious enough for many Chinese to use jade carvings of the Pixiu as ornaments even today.

Typical representations of the Pixiu:

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Do any of you have a Pixiu carving somewhere in your home?
The dead have passed beyond our power to honour or dishonour them, but not beyond our ability to try and understand.

#2 snowybeagle

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 02:07 AM

Thanks Yun.

I found more pictures from the site 貔貅的图片
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玉石貔貅的图片 - Jade Pixiu

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铜制貔貅的图片 - Bronze Pixiu

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石雕貔貅的图片 - Stone Pixiu

Perhaps I'm not as familiar with Chinese mythological creatures as I thought - I can't tell from the pictures alone that all the above are supposed to be the pixiu and not different creatures or other beasts.


貔貅的传说 at www.cartoonwin.com has a thread in Chinese for the legend of the creature.

旺财貔貅
貔貅的来历 貔貅,粤音读作"皮休"。相传貔貅是一种凶猛瑞兽,而这种猛兽分有雌性及雄性,雄性名为"貔",雌性名为"貅"。

Like Feng-Huang (凤凰) and QLn/kirin (麒麟), the term p 貔 refer to the male of the species and xiū 貅 refers to the female.

在古时这种瑞兽是分为一角或两角的,身有长鬃卷起,有双角的,有独角的。一角称为"天禄",两角称为"辟邪"。在南方,一般人是喜欢称这种瑞兽为"貔貅",而在北方则依然称为"辟邪",还有些人将它称为"怪兽"或"四不像"等。貔貅是以财为食的,纳食四方之财,一般从事正业或偏行的人,都会在公司或营业的地方摆放一只貔貅,如赌博、股票、期货、金融、赛马、娱乐业、房地产等行业。 中国传统是有"貔貅"的习俗,和龙狮一样,有将这地方的邪气赶走、带来欢乐及好运的作用。

In ancient times, two species of this creature was thought to exist, one with a single horn, the other with two horns.
The single-horned was called tiān l (天禄).
The double-horned was called pxi or bxi (辟邪).
Yun gave the meanings of both terms in the post above.

貔貅的形态 在汉书"西域传"上有一段记载:"乌戈山离国有桃拔、狮子、尿牛"。孟康注日:"桃拔,一日符拔,似鹿尾长,独角者称为天禄,两角者称为辟邪。"辟邪便是貔貅了。但经过朝代的转变,貔貅的形态比较统一,如有短翼、双角、卷尾、鬃须常与前胸或背脊连在一起,突眼,长獠牙。到现在常见到的貔貅多是独角、长尾巴。

The appearance of pxiū was mentioned in the Book of Han (汉书) on the section of Accounts of the Western Regions (西域传). In the country of Wū Gē Shān L there exist a creature called to b (桃拔), lion (狮子) and Rhinoceros (I assume the word was supposed to be 犀牛, not 尿牛.)

An annotation made by by Mng Kāng indicated to b to be a creature like deer with a long tail, those with one-horn called tiān l, those with two horns called bxi, thus equating the creature to pxiū.

The description of its appearance evolved through the dynasties until it settled on short wings, two horns, coiling tail, with manes connected to either the chest or the spine, protruding eyes and long menacing fangs.

Many depiction of the creature today gave it a single horn and a long tail.

貔貅的作用 貔貅与麒麟有所不同,貔貅是凶狠的瑞兽,且护主心特强。有镇宅辟邪的作用,古代还用它来镇墓,是墓穴的守护兽,一般古墓的墓前都可以看到,可知其杀气的勇猛。貔貅在风水上的作用,可分以下几点说明:一、有镇宅辟邪的作用。将已开光的貔貅安放在家中,可令家运转好,好运加强,赶走邪气,有镇宅之功效,成为家中的守护神,保合家平安。二、有趋财旺财的作用。这是较多人知道的,在一些赌馆麻雀馆,都很容易看到貔貅。

In ancient times, the pixiu was also used as tomb guardians, and sometimes in residential homes to ward off against evil. Nowadays, it could still be found in Chinese companies, or mahjong parlours (found in HK, and I think, Taiwan).

#3 Guest_Sawa_*

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 04:55 AM

So the Lions used in fengshui placements are also considered Pixius? :g:

Edit: find out they are hmm should have checked wiki first :P

Edited by Sawa, 05 October 2005 - 09:10 AM.


#4 Moon

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 05:29 AM

On Snowybeagle's request, here is a translation of some online information about the Pixiu.

Do any of you have a Pixiu carving somewhere in your home?



Yes i have a pair of jade ones.. the very dark majestic green kind..

The white jade pixiu that snowybeagle posted up are very very nice! Wish i own a pair of those.. Great information, Thanks!.
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#5 snowybeagle

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Posted 05 October 2005 - 08:43 PM

Strangely, some of the figurines of the pixiu did not have any horns.
How are others supposed to know they are pixius?

Ideas anyone?

Moon, are you able to post pictures of your pixius?

#6 Moon

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Posted 06 October 2005 - 12:59 AM

Strangely, some of the figurines of the pixiu did not have any horns.
How are others supposed to know they are pixius?

Ideas anyone?

Moon, are you able to post pictures of your pixius?



Ok i will try to but must give me some time because i have to ask my husband to download the pictures here (i dont know how to do it).. :P

i know mine are definitely pixius because the chinese characters 貔貅 in gold are engraved on the front base. ;) i dont remember there are horns too but they have wings though.
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#7 TMPikachu

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 03:11 AM

I think there is something uniquely chinese and awesome about a mythological animal that can suck up demons to turn into wealth.


it makes me smile and feel happy. Like, hahah! How awesome!
How Chinese!
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#8 Wei Feng

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Posted 07 October 2005 - 08:57 AM

Is it in feng Shui therms cald a Pi Yao?It looks realy looks like one
http://www.fengshuib....com/piyao.html
http://www.fengshuib...com/piyao1.html

Edited by Wei Feng, 07 October 2005 - 09:04 AM.

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#9 Moon

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Posted 13 October 2005 - 12:58 AM

Ok i will try to but must give me some time because i have to ask my husband to download the pictures here (i dont know how to do it).. :P

i know mine are definitely pixius because the chinese characters 貔貅 in gold are engraved on the front base. ;) i dont remember there are horns too but they have wings though.


Oops! tried a few times to post the pictures up, but somehow nothing shows.

will try again later.

Edited by Moon, 14 October 2005 - 07:28 PM.

Posted Image
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#10 urofpersia

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 08:21 AM

Oops! tried a few times to post the pictures up, but somehow nothing shows.

will try again later.


Ok, Moon here are the pics you sent me. I think the reason is because your pics are waaaay too large! :lol: You need to reduce the size of pics for the web bearing in mind not everyone has a large screen or high-speed internet connnection.

Posted Image

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Ur of Persia

#11 Moon

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Posted 17 October 2005 - 11:37 PM

Ok, Moon here are the pics you sent me. I think the reason is because your pics are waaaay too large! :lol: You need to reduce the size of pics for the web bearing in mind not everyone has a large screen or high-speed internet connnection.



:P like i said, i am a real dummy when it comes to computers..and i was only using a very normal sony digital camera to upload the pics. :P Hey thanks Urof persia..!

Anyway, strange that i have never notice before, i think this animal is not pixiu.. the chinese characters say 貅貍 xiu li.. what exactly is this creature? any chance it is the same specie as pixiu.. ?

if not, then my husband must be cheated because he asked for pixiu.. :angry:

Edited by Moon, 17 October 2005 - 11:38 PM.

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#12 snowybeagle

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Posted 18 October 2005 - 02:39 AM

According to the Chinese online dictionary, 貅 xiū is a type of creature that is like the leopard.
貔 p is also given the same definition.

I cannot find any online reference to 貅貍 xiū l.

One possibility is that you got the 貅 xiū half of the 貔貅 pxiū, the 貍 l (wild cat/fox-line animal) suffix just denoting the general type of animal.

In my earlier post (#2), I mentioned that 貔 p is the male while 貅 xiū is the female of the species, just like the fnghung 鳳凰 should actually be a male and female pair, but mostly depicted as a single bird nowadays.

#13 Lin Duanwen

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 07:28 PM

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Posted Image Flying Phoenix 飛鸞隱士

#14 Publius

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 07:39 PM

Hello Lin Duanwen,

thanks for sharing your images with us! I do have a few questions though:

What do the characters on the first Pixiu mean?

Also, is the last one a Qilin? It seems to have a single horn, an ornamental body that could be a scaly body, an ox tail, and hooves (maybe).

Cheers,

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#15 kaiselin

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Posted 12 March 2007 - 10:11 PM

Hello Lin Duanwen,

What do the characters on the first Pixiu mean?

Cheers,
Publius


The charactor on the top of the wing ( the thing on the middle of the back ) is the ancient word for heart/xin.

Edited by kaiselin, 12 March 2007 - 10:29 PM.

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