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Countries celebrating Chinese New Year


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#31 spadia

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 03:17 AM

Hi,

Chinese New Year is observed here in the Philippines, though not considered a public holiday. Even the Filipinos are into it, almost everyone here know what "Kung Hei Fat Choy" means. Dragon dance and Fireworks display are held in Manila's Chinatown. People give "Ampao" or "Angpao" and eat "Tikoy"

#32 qrasy

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 03:50 AM

Is the dominant Chinese language in Philippines Cantonese or Fujianese?
Angpao is clearly Fujianese/Hokkien of 紅包. The 'm' in 'Ampao' should be an assimilation of ng to the p. (should be just observed in Philippines... not in Indonesia)
"Kung Hei Fat Choi" for "恭喜發財" is Cantonese, Fujianese should be something like "Kyong Hi Huat Caay".
{I recall that in Indonesia, some Indonesians mixed Mandarin and Cantonese, "Gong Xi Fat Choi", in public advertisement... Posted Image}
And... what is "Tikoy" in Chinese?

Edited by qrasy, 02 February 2006 - 03:51 AM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#33 spadia

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 06:02 AM

Is the dominant Chinese language in Philippines Cantonese or Fujianese?
Angpao is clearly Fujianese/Hokkien of 紅包. The 'm' in 'Ampao' should be an assimilation of ng to the p. (should be just observed in Philippines... not in Indonesia)
"Kung Hei Fat Choi" for "恭喜發財" is Cantonese, Fujianese should be something like "Kyong Hi Huat Caay".
{I recall that in Indonesia, some Indonesians mixed Mandarin and Cantonese, "Gong Xi Fat Choi", in public advertisement... Posted Image}
And... what is "Tikoy" in Chinese?


The Chinese population in the Philippines is 80-90% Fujianese.
However, Filipinos are not aware of the differences between Cantonese and Fujianese. Maybe Kung Hei Fat Choy is more widely used around the world, or the first Chinese to greet Filipinos were the Cantonese :P
so that got stuck in their minds that Happy Chinese New Year = Gong XI Fa Cai
Among the Chinese they say "Kyong Hi Huat Caay" or Kyong Hi in short.

Ampao = is another Filipinized Chinese term,I believe...(Probably the Fookienese were the first to give angpao to Filipinos...)

Tikoy is Filipinized originally it is called Tiko = 甜糕

Some people made fun of the word Kung Hei Fat Choy because Fat Choy or Bat Choy(Tabachoy) is a Filipino slang for fat person. Batchoy is also a famous food from Central Philippines. confusing eh?! :D
http://www.globalpin...ge=1&endpage=15

If you check out http://www.tsinoy.com
You ll notice that Chinese New Year is widely discussed (Year of Fire dog....Feng Shui ...etc.its an interesting website

Speaking of Japanese and Koreans..my Korean colleagues enjoyed their day offs..while Japanese have work during Chinese New Year:lol:

Edited by spadia, 02 February 2006 - 06:29 AM.


#34 xng

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 08:42 AM

Hi,

Chinese New Year is observed here in the Philippines, though not considered a public holiday. Even the Filipinos are into it, almost everyone here know what "Kung Hei Fat Choy" means. Dragon dance and Fireworks display are held in Manila's Chinatown. People give "Ampao" or "Angpao" and eat "Tikoy"


We are talking about national holidays where all the banks and business are closed. Only those countries that I listed celebrate for 2 days or more.

It goes without saying that all the world's chinatown celebrates CNY.

#35 naruwan

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 03:13 PM

Just one question to our Vietnamese friends. Is it true that in Vietnam, there is a year of the cat instead of year of the rabit?
mudanin kata mudanin kata. kata siki-a kata siki-a. muhaiv ludun muhaiv ludun. kanta sipal tas-tas kanta sipal tas-tas. kanta sipal tunuh kanta sipal tunuh. sikavilun vini daingaz sikavilun vini daingaz.

Former hansioux

#36 qrasy

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Posted 02 February 2006 - 10:51 PM

By the way I once thought the replacement of Rabbit with Cat is somewhere near Japan.

I think it's confusion of 卯 Mo/Mẹo vs Mo (貓), either from Vietnamese or missionarists....
卯: 4th earthly branch; 5-7 a.m (giờ mẹo)
not sure if mo reading also applies to 卯..

Edited by qrasy, 02 February 2006 - 10:53 PM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#37 nguoiVietchanhtong

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Posted 03 February 2006 - 08:05 AM

Just one question to our Vietnamese friends. Is it true that in Vietnam, there is a year of the cat instead of year of the rabit?

I am not sure why but it's true. IMO, the Cats are close to the families than the rabbits. Rabbits are close to the Chinese since they originated from the North starting with hunting and gathering lifestyles.

#38 qrasy

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Posted 04 February 2006 - 12:31 AM

I'm starting to think about India, where (if I recall correctly) there is a Lion year rather than Tiger year. But seems that Rabbit is still rabbit...
For Vietnamese, seems that Mo reading of 卯 applies...

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#39 spadia

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Posted 06 February 2006 - 09:48 AM

We are talking about national holidays where all the banks and business are closed. Only those countries that I listed celebrate for 2 days or more.

It goes without saying that all the world's chinatown celebrates CNY.


hmm...according to Wikipedia Chinese New year is recently considered a working public holiday in the Philippines.
http://en.wikipedia....the_Philippines

it is not limited to Chinatown, in fact Filipinos are joining the fray :)

Anyway.the bottomline is ..we still have work :(

#40 xng

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 03:50 AM

hmm...according to Wikipedia Chinese New year is recently considered a working public holiday in the Philippines.
http://en.wikipedia....the_Philippines

it is not limited to Chinatown, in fact Filipinos are joining the fray :)

Anyway.the bottomline is ..we still have work :(


Chinese new year a public holiday in philippines ? Were you born and lived in philipines or just lived overseas and heard about it ? When I google philipines, it was not a public holiday, how many days of public holidays for CNY ?

It is a surprise considering that chinese only constitute a very minor percentage of the population.

#41 qrasy

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 06:17 AM

hmm...according to Wikipedia Chinese New year is recently considered a working public holiday in the Philippines.
http://en.wikipedia....the_Philippines

http://www.globalsou...DAYS/PPINES.HTM :g:
according to the site (from the pages in its directory):

(2006)
Mongolia
January
01 Sunday New Year's Day
28 Saturday Tsagaan Sar (Lunar New Year) (3 Days)

Macau SAR
January
01 Sunday New Year's Day
29 Sunday Chinese New Year (3 days)

South Korea
January
01 Sunday New Year's Day
February
08 Wednesday Sollal (Lunar New Year) (3 Days)
13 Monday Taeborum

:g:

Anyway.the bottomline is ..we still have work :(

If everyone has to work that day, then how could it be considered a "holiday"?

It is a surprise considering that chinese only constitute a very minor percentage of the population.

In Indonesia it's also quite small in population... What's the percentage in Philippines?

Edited by qrasy, 07 February 2006 - 06:23 AM.

The great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived and dishonest, but the myth, persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Belief in myths allows the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. - JFK


#42 spadia

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 10:08 AM

Chinese new year a public holiday in philippines ? Were you born and lived in philipines or just lived overseas and heard about it ? When I google philipines, it was not a public holiday, how many days of public holidays for CNY ?

It is a surprise considering that chinese only constitute a very minor percentage of the population.


I born and live in the Philippines.
I did my Google too and here is what I found...

http://www.supremeco...05/proc_756.htm

http://search.yehey....fproc_no532.htm

It is just one day :)

#43 xng

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Posted 07 February 2006 - 12:28 PM

I born and live in the Philippines.
I did my Google too and here is what I found...

http://www.supremeco...05/proc_756.htm

http://search.yehey....fproc_no532.htm

It is just one day :)


Why must you google if you are already living there and know that it is a public holiday ? What is a WORKING public holiday ?

Public holidays mean the whole nation shouldn't be working ie. banks and offices are closed.

#44 spadia

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 12:20 AM

Why must you google if you are already living there and know that it is a public holiday ? What is a WORKING public holiday ?

Public holidays mean the whole nation shouldn't be working ie. banks and offices are closed.


Well Im googling just to back my claims.

It is a "Special working holiday" that how it is called.

#45 xng

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Posted 08 February 2006 - 08:53 AM

Well Im googling just to back my claims.

It is a "Special working holiday" that how it is called.


What do you mean special working holiday ? Holiday means people are NOT working.
If most people are still working in philipines, I won't consider it a public holiday.




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