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#91 grimblegrumble

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Posted 14 August 2007 - 08:00 AM

Kamusta pare? Inom tayo! Makano yan? Isang Redhorse. Hindi ako makaintindi ng tagalog.

Haha, thats all I learned from my stay there in the Philippines. I was in Manila and Davao City with some of my Filipino friends and they brought me to lots of night clubs. I tried a dish called "sisig" (tastes great and goes great with beer!) but I was wondering, what part of the pig is it made out of?

I think like the Chinese, Filipinos are also not very picky when it comes to food. Anything edible is cooked and used as a source of nutrition. Sisig is basically the pig's cheeks, nose, and ears chopped into tiny pieces. I like it, too, but somehow it doesn't agree well with my digestive system especially when I eat it at night. Too greasy.

#92 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 15 August 2007 - 01:12 PM

Yes..I am Filipino Chinese...Filipino citizenship but Chinese parents.

I agree that the Chinese population here is a minority, but a lot of Filipinos here have Chinese roots. Below are some interesting Hispanicized Chinese surnames. These were given to the Chinese immigrants during the Spanish colonization of the Philippines(1500's to 1900's).
Cojuangco, Coyuito,Cotio (Co or 許) Tanchangco, Tanjuatco, Tanquincen (Tan or 陳), Gotauco, Gohoco, Gokongwei(Go 吳),Syjuco(Sy 施) Limcuco (Lim林), Chuacuco, Chuateco (Chua 蔡), Sozon, Sosuan (So or 蘇) .While during American occupation to present Republic, the Chinese allowed to retain their surnames unlike the Indonesian Chinese and Thai Chinese.


Culturally, I dont think so. There are strong Chinese influences here. Take for example the Filipino language:
The word Susi or key is derived from Chinese 鎖匙, Siopao, Siomai 燒賣燒包, Achi 阿姐, Ditsi (二姐) just to name a few.

There are some places in the Philippines derived from Chinese names (Ongpin St. 王彬街),Sangley pt.
it is a Naval base, the place used to be trading point for Chinese merchants, the word Sangley comes from 生意in Fookienese) The Chinese during the Spanish colonial days were called Sangleys, a story goes like this: A Spaniard asked a Chinese merchant who they are, the merchant thought the Spaniard is asking what he is up to, so he replied sangley, so the rest is history)
Even the Philippines' main island Luzon is derived from Chinese 呂宋.

Chinese institutions and organizations are allowed. We even have our Chinese newspaper circulations. Such as
www.siongpo.com
www.worldnews.com.ph/

As I've mentioned previously, our national hero Dr. Jose Rizal has Chinese roots.

There are some Chinese culture here that is quite uncommon to overseas Chinese.
Such as the Fukien word Chia tao (車頭) Can anyone guess what it means? :)

MOoncake game (pua tiong chiu)
http://www.common-ta...ulturearts.html

Interesting article here from Wikipedia
http://en.wikipedia....hinese_Filipino

I believe Chinese influence here is similar to Malaysia. Except most kids nowadays no longer speak fluent Chinese.



Just to add a few: before the declaration of martial law in 1972 by Pres. Marcos, by the way he too has Chinese ancestry. Local Chinese have their own Chinese educational school system, the Chinese Boys Scouts are associated and are directly under the Republic of China, many martial art schools are loyalist to the ROC and finally ROC recognize and accept all Chinese citizens as citizen of ROC no difference from Chinese in Taiwan. Many Pilipino-Chinese went to Taiwan to work and no restriction was apply on them except they must join or are drated into the ROC military for compulsary service, I think two years of service as citizen of ROC.

After ROC lost its' place in the UN to the PROC, thanks to the USA ROC policy started to change and one of the changes was that Pilipini-Chinese of Chinese citizens are no longer consider citizens of ROC but are classify as de facto citizens without any rights or protection from the ROC although many still carry the ROC passport in those passports is a stamp that state that the holder is not a full time ROC citizen th epassport is basically useless, those Pilipino-Chinese holders of ROC passports became stateless people and that was the time that many local Chinese started to apply for Philippine citizenship.

The Chinese Boys Scout in the Philippines was dissolved and was integrated with the Philippine Boy Scouts.

Edited by Wan Ren aka Danny, 15 August 2007 - 01:22 PM.


#93 amazonia13

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 04:01 AM

Chinese here in the Philippines are usually the well-off group. However, some Tranditional well off families here still believes that Chinese is for chinese. and this kind of mentallity always ends up misunderstanding about chinese people. I must admit, I am also a victim of this practice. I am half chinese and yet the guy I am dating still dont consider me as chinese. I dont know how much chinese blood a person should have to be considered as "chinese" by these traditional well-off families. :(

#94 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 22 August 2007 - 03:17 PM

Chinese here in the Philippines are usually the well-off group. However, some Tranditional well off families here still believes that Chinese is for chinese. and this kind of mentallity always ends up misunderstanding about chinese people. I must admit, I am also a victim of this practice. I am half chinese and yet the guy I am dating still dont consider me as chinese. I dont know how much chinese blood a person should have to be considered as "chinese" by these traditional well-off families. :(


In every society or race there will always be racial profiling. In the Philippines it is about rich and poor, about ethnicity, tradition & religion. It does not only exist in the Fili-Chinese community but also in the local Filipinos as well.

Nonetheless, there are now many Fili-Chinese families who are more acceptable to multiculturalism. In fact majority of Fil-Chinese younger generation are more accepting than the early generation.

I for one am a baby boomer who grew up back in the 60s and 70s (in fact I am still growing hehe) and IMO the reason why there was so much division and racisim was because families at that time felt that they need to protect their own group against outsiders who are viewed as a threat to their well being which in some degree was very true.

Local Chinese at that time could not hide from getting attack by locals, the attacks come mostly from verbal abused, taunting, spitting and physical harassment. That kind of confrontation created a barrier between locals and Fil-Chinese and in the Fil-Chinese a sub barrier existed between tsu si ya (half Chinese) and none half Chinese. Because the none tsu si yah msitrusted the tsu si yah's character.

Character would mean, at that time locals are view as untrustworthy, lazy, and full of bs and that characterization became more evident and was compounded with the locals hostile attitude towards Fil-Chinese.

In most cases though, many locals who have prooven to be of good moral character and good social well being were accepted and would lead to mix marriages or marriages.

The stigma that have branded locals as lazy, untrustworthy, uncultured and irresponsible have stucked with them up to this date and that is the first thing that most Fili-Chinese would see or treat locals or tsu si ya. In most cases after they get to know them or each other by exhibiting good manners, good culture, character and attitude that relationship become more positive.

Being Chinese i snot only about having Chinese blood or ancestors it is about understanding the Chinese ways. There are many Europeans who have great understanding of the Chinese culture that basically Chinese do not consider them as foreigners at all. In fact in the eyes of mainlanders, I would be consider none Chinese because I do not speak mandarin which I have no problem with I am happy with what I am.

People who are too blinded with social or racial aristocracy is best ignored :notworthy:

Edited by Wan Ren aka Danny, 22 August 2007 - 03:20 PM.


#95 sg_han

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Posted 24 August 2007 - 07:30 AM

Wan Ren aka Dann... your homeland is in the Philppines but you are now a Canadian Chinese?
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#96 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:26 AM

Wan Ren aka Dann... your homeland is in the Philppines but you are now a Canadian Chinese?


I am now a multi person.......Fil-Chinese-Canadian. :notworthy: I may want to be an American, New Zealander or Australian :D

In hokkian this refer to us ' di siao siao" :g: :(

I guess I have to be Canadian first because it is my new adopted home and country, Filipino second because it is my birth place and Chinese third because of my ancestors. Just like Americans they do not consider themselves as English Americans but just plain patriotic Americans.

#97 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 25 August 2007 - 11:26 AM

Wan Ren aka Dann... your homeland is in the Philppines but you are now a Canadian Chinese?


I am now a multi person.......Fil-Chinese-Canadian. :notworthy: I may want to be an American, New Zealander or Australian :D

In hokkian this refer to us ' di siao siao" :g: :(

I guess I have to be Canadian first because it is my new adopted home and country, Filipino second because it is my birth place and Chinese third because of my ancestors. Just like Americans they do not consider themselves as English Americans but just plain patriotic Americans.

#98 sg_han

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 10:33 AM

I am now a multi person.......Fil-Chinese-Canadian. :notworthy: I may want to be an American, New Zealander or Australian :D

In hokkian this refer to us ' di siao siao" :g: :(

I guess I have to be Canadian first because it is my new adopted home and country, Filipino second because it is my birth place and Chinese third because of my ancestors. Just like Americans they do not consider themselves as English Americans but just plain patriotic Americans.



Tell me more about life of a typical filipino chinese. i am interested to know about it. care to tell me=)
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#99 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 11:40 AM

Tell me more about life of a typical filipino chinese. i am interested to know about it. care to tell me=)



I can only tell you about it during my generation of growing up in the Philippines the time line would be from the late 50s to the mid 90s.

Majority of early Chinese who came to the Philippines were not rich most of the Chinese are from the Fujian province from villages and areas such as Quanzhou or Chan chiu, Chio Sai, Xiamen, Putian, etc. averagely are from Quanzhou.

They left China out of neccessity because of the ongoing civil war, uncertainty, social turmoil, and the threat of an open war with Japan. They consist of farmers, carpenters, businessmen etc. etc.

Many of those early Chinese immigrants share the same expereince with all other hua kiaos from North America to Europe they all have to struggle and work in difficult situation they were heavily discriminated.

In Manila, Chinese preservere and work hard to blend in with the Filipino society they share their culture and their traites, there was intermarriages. Heavy distrust of local Chinese towards the Filipinos was high because IMO the native Filipinos who were generally very freindly and welcoming have been heavily influence by their colonial rulers back then that situation develop a hostile attitude towards Chinese.

The Fil-Chinese became defensive and the more they felt that they have to stick together in order to survive in that kind of environment.

Fil-Chinese were hard working, they have strong bond towards family members, clan members and fellow Chinese. Early Fil-Chinese social virtue was strong and honorable it was so strong that verbal contracts & promises was highly acceptable and is bonding enough in the business community.

They would work long hours, community centres that took the form of martial clubs, clan association and temples were very helpful to provide assistance and aid to Fil-Chinese who are in trouble be it medical, social, education or business.

Life in the 60s as I can remember were very dificult as far as associating with locals. 85% of Fil-Chinese would be confronted with verbal attacks, and physical assualt when ever they venture into the mainstream commnity. The only way a Fil-Chinese can escape such abuses is for them not to be too Chinese or look like Chinese. Chinese who have darker skin and less kinky or slid eyes can easily blend in.

But for Fil-Chinese like me who have kinky eyes it is difficult not to get attack. In spite of all these social hostility Fil-CHinese were able to found success and stability life of Fil-Chinese were more stable and secure compare to local Filipinos and IMHO it is because Fil-Chinese have the following traites:
1. Honest
2. Integrity
3. Hardworking
4. Fortitude
5. Sense of pride
6. Family and community responsibility
7. Foresight for a better tomorrow
8. Virtue

One thing that I like to share and the reason why I say those attibutes is because I have witness through my father, grand parents, grand uncles, and many of my elders especially my father that in his early business life his financial aid or loans was granted to him through verbal contracts only. Bankers and financers give more value to verbal contracts then written ones. Now a days both verbal and written contracts are still not good enough to secure an honest loan or aid, now a days honor, virtue, respect, and integrity are all but a fools man own habit. Too many people are cheating each other and taking advantage of those who are honest.

In the late 80s to the mid 90s there was a spike of kidnappings targetted against Fil-Chinese. These kidnappings was later learn was being operated by organize crime at first it was thought that it was local base mostly Politicians, and other ranking public officers such as those in the law enforcement. Later although no clear evidence was presented it was highly suspected that it was criminal gangs from mainlabd China who introduce this "lucrative bussiness" by partnering up with corrupt local officials.

Fil-Chinese rally together against this criminal act and we even approach the Chinese (PRC at that time the ROC have already lost their status) Embassy for help but was informed that there is nothing they can do except to issue a public opinion regarding what is happening. And the reason was because the PRC do not recognized the rights of overseas Chinese even though many of them are still "Chinese citizens". We were basically left on our own :(

The Philippine government finally took some serious action after they received reports that Fil-Chinese were planning to start arming themselves (not with martial weapons but with firearms) and create a self defense police force. The Philippine government then created the PACC (Philippine Anti Crime Commission) and the Fil-Chinese were "encourage" to throw all their support to this agency.

Now, thatI am not in the country for more than 10 years what I have seen from my nieces and nephews is that 85% of racial attacks towards Fil-Chinese have disappeared. Things are a lot better now as far as social life is concern but not in security.

IMO, new generation of Fil-Chinese are slowly loosing their identity and integrity of our forefathers.

#100 sg_han

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Posted 26 August 2007 - 11:48 PM

I can only tell you about it during my generation of growing up in the Philippines the time line would be from the late 50s to the mid 90s.

Majority of early Chinese who came to the Philippines were not rich most of the Chinese are from the Fujian province from villages and areas such as Quanzhou or Chan chiu, Chio Sai, Xiamen, Putian, etc. averagely are from Quanzhou.

They left China out of neccessity because of the ongoing civil war, uncertainty, social turmoil, and the threat of an open war with Japan. They consist of farmers, carpenters, businessmen etc. etc.

Many of those early Chinese immigrants share the same expereince with all other hua kiaos from North America to Europe they all have to struggle and work in difficult situation they were heavily discriminated.

In Manila, Chinese preservere and work hard to blend in with the Filipino society they share their culture and their traites, there was intermarriages. Heavy distrust of local Chinese towards the Filipinos was high because IMO the native Filipinos who were generally very freindly and welcoming have been heavily influence by their colonial rulers back then that situation develop a hostile attitude towards Chinese.

The Fil-Chinese became defensive and the more they felt that they have to stick together in order to survive in that kind of environment.

Fil-Chinese were hard working, they have strong bond towards family members, clan members and fellow Chinese. Early Fil-Chinese social virtue was strong and honorable it was so strong that verbal contracts & promises was highly acceptable and is bonding enough in the business community.

They would work long hours, community centres that took the form of martial clubs, clan association and temples were very helpful to provide assistance and aid to Fil-Chinese who are in trouble be it medical, social, education or business.

Life in the 60s as I can remember were very dificult as far as associating with locals. 85% of Fil-Chinese would be confronted with verbal attacks, and physical assualt when ever they venture into the mainstream commnity. The only way a Fil-Chinese can escape such abuses is for them not to be too Chinese or look like Chinese. Chinese who have darker skin and less kinky or slid eyes can easily blend in.

But for Fil-Chinese like me who have kinky eyes it is difficult not to get attack. In spite of all these social hostility Fil-CHinese were able to found success and stability life of Fil-Chinese were more stable and secure compare to local Filipinos and IMHO it is because Fil-Chinese have the following traites:
1. Honest
2. Integrity
3. Hardworking
4. Fortitude
5. Sense of pride
6. Family and community responsibility
7. Foresight for a better tomorrow
8. Virtue

One thing that I like to share and the reason why I say those attibutes is because I have witness through my father, grand parents, grand uncles, and many of my elders especially my father that in his early business life his financial aid or loans was granted to him through verbal contracts only. Bankers and financers give more value to verbal contracts then written ones. Now a days both verbal and written contracts are still not good enough to secure an honest loan or aid, now a days honor, virtue, respect, and integrity are all but a fools man own habit. Too many people are cheating each other and taking advantage of those who are honest.

In the late 80s to the mid 90s there was a spike of kidnappings targetted against Fil-Chinese. These kidnappings was later learn was being operated by organize crime at first it was thought that it was local base mostly Politicians, and other ranking public officers such as those in the law enforcement. Later although no clear evidence was presented it was highly suspected that it was criminal gangs from mainlabd China who introduce this "lucrative bussiness" by partnering up with corrupt local officials.

Fil-Chinese rally together against this criminal act and we even approach the Chinese (PRC at that time the ROC have already lost their status) Embassy for help but was informed that there is nothing they can do except to issue a public opinion regarding what is happening. And the reason was because the PRC do not recognized the rights of overseas Chinese even though many of them are still "Chinese citizens". We were basically left on our own :(

The Philippine government finally took some serious action after they received reports that Fil-Chinese were planning to start arming themselves (not with martial weapons but with firearms) and create a self defense police force. The Philippine government then created the PACC (Philippine Anti Crime Commission) and the Fil-Chinese were "encourage" to throw all their support to this agency.

Now, thatI am not in the country for more than 10 years what I have seen from my nieces and nephews is that 85% of racial attacks towards Fil-Chinese have disappeared. Things are a lot better now as far as social life is concern but not in security.

IMO, new generation of Fil-Chinese are slowly loosing their identity and integrity of our forefathers.


ah.....another similar story of a typical SEA chinese
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#101 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 28 August 2007 - 01:08 PM

ah.....another similar story of a typical SEA chinese



Actually there is a lot of truth in that word "typical" not only of SEA Chinese but majority of early overseas Chinese around the world had the same expereince. Those were very trying times for Chinese life was all about preserverance, fortitude and about the future the future to give to their children, grand children a better life. Our forefathers went through a lot, Chinese in North America had to work in difficult condition as well but in the end they succeeded.

That is why majority of SEA nations one will find that the economies of those countries are mostly being manage and operated by hua kiao. Their success story speaks very clear of their discipline, dedication and strong family values to traditional Chinese way of life.

And this is what many mainlanders missed out they thought that we the hua kiaos have always had a comfortable life style but what they failed to see is that our forefathers went through a lot of hardship the same or maybe more hardship then those in mainland who suffer under Mao the only big difference is that the hardship that ourforefathers went through were investment that bare positive fruites and there was a rainbow at the end of the road.

Edited by Wan Ren aka Danny, 28 August 2007 - 01:17 PM.


#102 polar_zen

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Posted 01 September 2007 - 11:36 PM

Good thread. I'm half chinese-filipino (other half being Greek) myself, but I've never been to the Philippines (pretty much American).

I'd like to add that at least from stories from my relatives, they weren't treated as outsiders or very badly, but perhaps that is due to them being born in the PI than anything else. Everyone's experiences are different. Filipinos in general are a very warm and open people. You never saw the kind of discrimination you would see in let's say Indonesia. Most Chinese who change their names to more Filipino sounding names weren't generally forced to by the locals.
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#103 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 10:31 AM

Good thread. I'm half chinese-filipino (other half being Greek) myself, but I've never been to the Philippines (pretty much American).

I'd like to add that at least from stories from my relatives, they weren't treated as outsiders or very badly, but perhaps that is due to them being born in the PI than anything else. Everyone's experiences are different. Filipinos in general are a very warm and open people. You never saw the kind of discrimination you would see in let's say Indonesia. Most Chinese who change their names to more Filipino sounding names weren't generally forced to by the locals.


I agree Filipinos in general are very friendly and warm but IMO and in my expereince it was those Filipinos who have colonial mentality or upbringing that have a more hostile or call it racist attitude.

Most Chinese change their name to locals mainly because for convinience purposes. The Philippines have a very stringent anti forigner laws that are aim mainly on none Americans and none Spaniards. Chinese was what the law was targetted, both local Chinese even if they are of the second, third generation or even if they are married to Filipinas are not allowed to own properties or engage in business. That is why many Fil-Chinese own businesses are under the name of their Filipino relatives or wife. Fil-Chinese children whom many can hardly speak any hokkian were still holding immigration cards and are not Filipino citizens it was only during Pres. Marcos era that all Fil-Chinese especially those locally born and have Filipina mothers were allowed to become citizens.

Pres. Marcos saw the injustice towards the Fil-Chinese and he change that now majority of Fil-Chinese have become more connected to the Philippines than to China.

Philippine citizenship was very hard to acquire during those days because at that time from 1915 - 1960 the Philippines was the only productice, stable and rich nation in SOuth East Asia. Ironically though, the citizenship law was mainly only targetted against Chinese. Americans have no problem owning and operating big businesses.

In some degree it was force by the circumstances that discriminated against them to change their name to local names and this adaptation is a sign that Chinese were willing to sacrifice and work hard in order to provide a stable future to their decesdants they were willing to integrate be part of their new home new nation.

Edited by Wan Ren aka Danny, 02 September 2007 - 10:35 AM.


#104 polar_zen

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Posted 02 September 2007 - 11:17 AM

I agree Filipinos in general are very friendly and warm but IMO and in my expereince it was those Filipinos who have colonial mentality or upbringing that have a more hostile or call it racist attitude.

Most Chinese change their name to locals mainly because for convinience purposes.
In some degree it was force by the circumstances that discriminated against them to change their name to local names and this adaptation is a sign that Chinese were willing to sacrifice and work hard in order to provide a stable future to their decesdants they were willing to integrate be part of their new home new nation.


I know that. When my relatives went from China to the Philippines they changed their name in order to better assimilate into society. For example taking the full chinese name, making it your family name, and then adopting a Filipino first name, or simply filipinizing the last name to make it sound more Spanish.
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#105 Wan Ren aka Danny

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Posted 03 September 2007 - 11:42 AM

I know that. When my relatives went from China to the Philippines they changed their name in order to better assimilate into society. For example taking the full chinese name, making it your family name, and then adopting a Filipino first name, or simply filipinizing the last name to make it sound more Spanish.


In rural areas local Filipinos are very warm and hospitable they are very welcoming and many Chinese found their new homes and families in those areas. In urban settings it was different, it was a struggle as I have pointed out the hostility and aggression against the Chinese was very strong.

Time has change, the preserverance of our tai kong has bare positive fruites and the expereinces that local Pinoys have been expereincing in having to work overseas and taste for themselves what prejudisim is really like has made mojority of local Pinoys more tolerant and accepting. The many Fil-Chinese who are in the government both in the civil and military service has also made a difference. Their leadership, exemplarary duties and willingness to sacrifice their lives for the community and the nation plus their outstanding performance of improving the standard of living of their constituens and most of all the volunteer social organizations headed by different Fil-Chinese groups in providing much needed aid to the local community has really integrated Filipinos and Chinese as one.

In every disasters & calamities Fil-Chinese organization and personel will be at the fore front helping and aiding victims may it be fire, earthquake, typhoons or volcanic eruption Fil-Chinese aid groups will be there uncorruptably serving all.

Edited by Wan Ren aka Danny, 03 September 2007 - 11:46 AM.





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